Air Force Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment (ADAPT)

The primary objective of the Air Force Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment (ADAPT) Program is to promote readiness, health and wellness through the prevention and treatment of substance misuse and abuse. The ADAPT Program is designed to identify risk factors and help individuals avoid hazardous substance use before it causes significant damage to their health and career.

The ADAPT program, under the umbrella of the mental health flight, provides comprehensive assessment and treatment for active duty servicemen and women to with concerns related to alcohol or other substance use disorders, to include gambling addiction. The ADAPT program also provides expert consultation services to its key customers, including active duty service members and unit leaders.

The ADAPT Program offers:

he primary objective of the ADAPT Program is to promote readiness, health and wellness through the prevention and treatment of substance misuse and abuse. The ADAPT Program is designed to identify risk factors and help individuals avoid hazardous substance use before it causes significant damage to their health and career.

The ADAPT Program offers:

Substance abuse awareness outreach: Briefings offered to ensure members of the community understand the definitions and risks of hazardous substance use as well as available options for seeking help.
Substance Use Assessment: Comprehensive evaluation of substance use covers demographic, family, social, behavioral, psychological, spiritual and medical factors. Standardized questionnaires are combined with a clinical interview to identify risk factors and to make recommendations for treatment or prevention services.
Alcohol Brief Counseling (ABC): ABC includes an individualized consultation to provide feedback from the assessment and develop a personalized change plan. Education is provided on AF and DoD substance use policy and related civilian laws. ABC may also include modules on values clarification, anxiety or anger management, assertive communication, healthy thinking, sleep enhancement, and relaxation.
Substance abuse treatment services (group/individual): Individual and group treatment services are provided to individuals who are addressing substance abuse or dependency issues. Referrals to higher levels of substance abuse treatment, such as intensive outpatient treatment or inpatient treatment, will also be provided when needed.
Other resources include:
Initial civilian employee assessment for work-related misconduct that is related to substance use, as well as referrals for treatment, education and prevention classes.
Family programs, including individual and group counseling sessions.
Civilian supervisor training, first duty station and key-personnel briefings.

 

Substance abuse awareness outreach: Briefings offered to ensure members of the community understand the definitions and risks of hazardous substance use as well as available options for seeking help.

Substance Use Assessment: Comprehensive evaluation of substance use covers demographic, family, social, behavioral, psychological, spiritual and medical factors. Standardized questionnaires are combined with a clinical interview to identify risk factors and to make recommendations for treatment or prevention services.

Alcohol Brief Counseling: Alcohol Brief Counseling includes an individualized consultation to provide feedback from the assessment and develop a personalized change plan. Education is provided on Air Force and DoD substance use policy and related civilian laws. Alcohol Brief Counseling may also include modules on values clarification, anxiety or anger management, assertive communication, healthy thinking, sleep enhancement, and relaxation.

Substance abuse treatment services (group/individual): Individual and group treatment services are provided to individuals who are addressing substance abuse or dependency issues. Referrals to higher levels of substance abuse treatment, such as intensive outpatient treatment or inpatient treatment, will also be provided when needed.

Other resources include: Initial civilian employee assessment for work-related misconduct that is related to substance use, as well as referrals for treatment, education and prevention classes. Family programs, including individual and group counseling sessions. Civilian supervisor training, first duty station and key-personnel briefings.

Alcohol Misuse.

The Air Force policy recognizes that alcohol misuse negatively affects public behavior, duty performance, and/or physical and mental health. The AF provides comprehensive clinical assistance to eligible beneficiaries seeking help for an alcohol problem.

Illicit Drug Use. The Air Force does not tolerate the illegal or improper use of drugs by AF personnel. Such use: Is a serious breach of discipline. Is incompatible with service in the AF. Automatically places the member's continued service in jeopardy. Can lead to criminal prosecution resulting in a punitive discharge or administrative actions, including separation or discharge under other than honorable conditions.

ADAPT Program Overview.

The primary objectives of the ADAPT Program are to promote readiness, health, and wellness through the prevention and treatment of substance misuse and abuse, to minimize the negative consequences of substance misuse and abuse to the individual, family, and organization, to provide comprehensive education and treatment to individuals who experience problems attributed to substance misuse or abuse, to restore function and return identified substance abusers to unrestricted duty status or to assist them in their transition to civilian life, as appropriate.

These objectives are met through four levels of activities: Universal (Primary) Prevention and Education: This includes population-based outreach, education, prevention programs, screening, and consultation. Community based prevention and education efforts will be delivered by ADAPT staff through coordinated efforts with other community agencies.

Selective (Targeted) Prevention: This involves global screenings for alcohol misuse, as well as initiatives to prevent future alcohol misuse, prescription drug misuse, or drug use with individuals who are identified as high risk or are suspected of substance misuse. Selective prevention includes screening, assessment, education, brief preventive counseling, and tailored feedback in specific individuals or groups identified as moderate to high risk.

Indicated Prevention: This is indicated for those who are engaging in risky drinking but have not yet developed problems associated with their drinking. Individuals in this group can be identified through screening in primary care or other appropriate setting. The majority of these individuals are best served through motivational interviewing and brief advice. This focuses on those who are already in the early stages of alcohol and substance use.

Treatment and Continuing Care (Aftercare): Provide evidence-based substance use disorder treatment for individuals who are abusing or are dependent on alcohol or drugs that follows the clinical practice guidelines. The primary aim should be restoring function, improving quality of life, and returning members to productive and unrestricted duty, or to assist them in their transition to civilian life, as appropriate.

Use of Evidence-Based Services.

ADAPT Program will provide evidence-based substance use disorder services that adhere to this instruction, clinical practice guidelines, as well as other DoD/Veterans Affairs sanctioned task force and/or accredited professional organizations specializing in the treatment of substance use disorders.

Substance Misuse Prevention Strategies.

Substance misuse prevention efforts are geared toward enhancing individual and unit resiliency, both of which can be compromised by hazardous alcohol use and SUDs. Prevention strategies must be comprehensively structured to educate and inform the overall population as well as specifically target higher risk populations.

In collaboration with other Integrated Delivery System members, the ADAPT staff works to develop and implement prevention programs geared towards increasing organizational and individual awareness of SUD issues, including misuse and abuse of prescription medications, illegal and illicit drug abuse, trends, and threat to mission readiness.

Patient Assessment and Diagnostic Responsibilities.

Private Bed Room

Treatment or prevention counseling for all patients should be based on thorough assessment (e.g. Substance Use Assessment Tool, clinical interview, and collection of collateral data as appropriate), determination of risk, and should be tailored for the individual.

Evaluation for specialty treatment requires a thorough biopsychosocial assessment that adheres to evidence based clinical practice guidelines from VA/DoD. The initial assessment in ADAPT is the Substance Use Assessment Tool Intake/Assessment. Information from the Substance Use Assessment Tool intake is utilized to make treatment recommendations.

When treating ADAPT patients, providers and technicians must do a complete review of the individual's medical history, including a thorough medication reconciliation. This can help providers uncover potential poly-substance abuse disorders, identify drug-seeking behaviors, and target therapy appropriately. Throughout treatment, providers should periodically monitor any changes in the patient's medical diagnoses or medication regimen in order to identify unrecognized prescription medication abuse.

Detoxification.

Patients being referred for inpatient treatment will be assessed to determine the level of detoxification services required. When medically indicated, patient detoxification will be managed on an outpatient basis prior to inpatient or residential treatment. Patients assessed as requiring medically managed detoxification (inpatient) will be entered into an appropriate medical facility. All patients must have 72 hours of monitored abstinence (inpatient or outpatient) prior to departure from detoxification.

Continuity of Care in Treatment.

ADAPT Program staff will communicate with the inpatient treatment facility to ensure continuity of care. Inpatient treatment may begin immediately, if the history, physical examination, and other documentation indicate that the patient can safely begin treatment. If, however, the patient experiences symptoms of apparent withdrawal, he or she will be re-assessed and a detoxification protocol initiated.

Considerations following Treatment Completion.

At a minimum, a relapse prevention plan will be created (or reviewed if created prior to discharge) and agreed upon. Suicide risk will also be assessed at this visit and a follow-up visit will be scheduled. Patients discharged from inpatient residential will be monitored over a sufficient period of time.

Patients returning from an IOP, residential/inpatient treatment facility will have a meeting within 14 calendar days of return to assess the patient's progress during inpatient or residential treatment and design a continuing care (aftercare) plan.

Decisions regarding continuing care (aftercare) services will be based on a current assessment of status and will include establishment of a continuing care treatment plan identifying specific goals, interventions, and means to assess interventions.

Use of pharmacological treatments, such as Naltraxone, Disulfiram, Acamprosate, etc., will be strictly monitored by the psychiatrist or physician who has prescribed the medication. The ADAPT Program staff will communicate with all providers to ensure continuity of treatment.

Long-Term Inpatient/Residential Substance Use Treatment. Whenever possible and appropriate, military inpatient or residential substance use treatment facilities will be used for service members for long-term treatment.

Continuing Care (Aftercare) Program.

Upon completion of the treatment section of the ADAPT Program (e.g. Outpatient, IOP, PHP, etc.), the member will begin a period of continuing care (aftercare).

All patients who completed treatment will participate in continuing care (aftercare) as part of the ADAPT Program. Continuing care (aftercare) does not begin until all goals of the treatment plan are met. Once these goals are met, the patient is moved into continuing care (aftercare).

Patient's progress will be monitored by the ADAPT staff at least every 30 days while the patient is in continuing care (aftercare). The goal of continuing care is to ensure any new goals are addressed, the patient does not need to be returned to treatment, and a relapse prevention plan is implemented and proceeding smoothly.

The with a drug history undergo monthly random drug testing for one year following their most recent discharge from a treatment program.

Program Completion. Patients will not be considered to have successfully completed the ADAPT Program until the patient has completed treatment and continuing care (aftercare). The TT determines, based on VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines for Management of Substance Use Disorders, current DSM criteria and ASAM PPC, patient's progress towards agreed upon goals and/or issues as stated in the treatment and continuing care (aftercare) plans, when the patient no longer requires program resources.

The Air Force determines, based on VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines for Management of Substance Use Disorders, current DSM criteria and ASAM PPC, patient's progress towards agreed upon goals and/or issues as stated in the treatment and continuing care (aftercare) plans, when the patient no longer requires program resources.

Call (330) 935-2663

If you or a loved one is dealing with substance abuse or seeking mental health therapy, contact the California Palms at 330-935-2663. Our team of compassionate admissions counselors are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to help you take the first step towards recovery. Travel to and from our location in Northeast Ohio, (one hour from Cleveland/Pittsburgh) is covered by various sources, don't let location be an issue. We accept many forms of insurance including: Veterans Choice Program, TRICARE, Aetna, Anthem, Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Cigna, Humana, Medical Mutual United Health Group and finance companies, like Prosper Healthcare and My Treatment Lender. We may also provide full or partial scholarships for free care on a case by case basis.

3.3The primary objectives of the ADAPT Program are to: promote readiness, health, and wellness through the prevention and treatment of substance misuse and abuse; to minimize the negative consequences of substance misuse and abuse to the individual, family, and organization; to provide comprehensive education and treatment to individuals who experience problems attributed to substance misuse or abuse; to restore function and return identified substance abusers to unrestricted duty status or to assist them in their transition to civilian life, as appropriate.

The ADAPT Program Element currently only serves members on Active Duty Orders to include members of Guard and Reserve Units. Members must be enrolled into this Military Treatment Facility (MTF), to be eligible for services.

ADAPT Services Include:

Assessment and treatment for an alcohol or other substance abuse disorder
Assessment process includes a computer based screening with standardized measures and comprehensive clinical interview
Individualized Patient education and Intervention
Recommendation for appropriate ASAM-II level of care placement
Referral services for Detoxification
Referral Service for Tricare or DoD approved Intensive Outpatient or Inpatient Care
Psychiatric Consultation and medication management
Coordination of care with Unit Commander and First Sergeant and Primary Medical Provide
***All evaluation and treatment services are provided by a licensed mental health professionals and/or certified substance abuse counselor***

Consultation Services:

ADAPT program staff members are available to Commanders, First Sergeants, Supervisors and others to provide guidance on how to handle an individual dealing with alcohol or other substance abuse concerns
ADAPT program staff provide outreach and education to specific Units or to the base wide population
Consultation with Primary Care Mangers for the treatment needs of active duty dependents
Referral assistance to additional helping agencies as appropriate

Alabama
Maxwell Air Force Base and Gunter Annex: Located in Montgomery, Alabama, Maxwell and Gunter Annex are primarily academic-oriented installations educating entry-level Airmen through senior-level Officers. Air University, the 42nd Air Base Wing and the 908th Airlift Wing are all located at Maxwell and Gunter Annex.

Alaska
Eielson AFB: Located 26 miles southeast of Fairbanks, Eielson AFB is in the interior of Alaska, about 110 miles south of the Arctic Circle. It's home to the 354th Fighter Wing.

Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson is the combination of the former Elmendorf Air Force base and Fort Richardson. Located near Anchorage, the largest city in Alaska, it is home to the 673rd Air Base Wing, the 3rd Wing, Alaskan NORAD (North American Aerospace Defense Command) Region, the 11th Air Force and several Army divisions.

 

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Arizona
Davis-Monthan AFB: This is a key Air Combat Command installation, located within the city limits of Tucson. Built in 1925, Davis-Monthan is home to the 355th Fighter Wing.

Luke AFB: The 56th Fighter wing is located at his base seven miles west of Glendale and about 15 miles west of Phoenix. It was built in 1940.

 

Arkansas
Little Rock AFB: This base in Pulaski County is home to the 19th Airlift Wing and the 189th Airlift Wing of the Arkansas Air National Guard. Both fly the C-130 Hercules transport aircraft.

California
Beale AFB: A base rich in history, Beale is at the forefront of the Air Force’s future in high technology. Its host unit is the 9th Reconnaissance Wing.

Edwards AFB: Designated as the Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards is the Air Force Materiel Command center of excellence for research, development, and test and evaluation of aerospace systems for the United States and its allies. It's home to the 412th Test Wing, and the closest Air Force base to Area 51.

Los Angeles AFB: Headquarters of the Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC), part of Air Force Space Command, this base also is home to the 61st Air Base Group.

Travis AFB: Located in Solano County, Travis handles more cargo and passenger traffic through its airport than any other military air terminal in the United States. It's home to the 349th Air Mobility Wing and the 60th Air Mobility Wing.

Vandenberg AFB: This base's location on the northern Pacific Ocean makes it possible to easily launch satellites into polar orbit.

 

It's home to the 30th Space Wing and the 381st Training Group.

Colorado
Buckley AFB: This base's host unit, the 460th Space Wing, falls under the direction of Air Force Space Command. It's also home to the 140th Wing of the Colorado Air National Guard.

Peterson AFB: This base and the 21st Space Wing are the Air Force's only organization providing missile warning and space control to unified commanders and combat forces worldwide.

Schriever AFB: Schriever AFB is the home of the 50th Space Wing, the Space Innovation and Development Center, the Missile Defense Agency's Joint National Integration Center, the 310th Space Group and numerous tenant organizations.

The United States Air Force Academy: This is both a military organization and an accredited college for the undergraduate education of commissioned officers for the Air Force.

The 10th Air Base Wing and the 306th Flying Training Group also are housed here.

Delaware
Dover AFB: Located in the center of the Delmarva peninsula, the base is home to the 436th Airlift Wing and the Charles C. Carson Center for Mortuary Affairs, the largest military mortuary in the Department of Defense.

District of Columbia
Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling: Originally named Bolling Field, this Air Force base was merged with the Naval Support Facility Anacostia in 2010.

Florida
Eglin AFB: The Air Armament Center at Eglin is responsible for developing, deploying and sustaining all air-delivered weapons. It's also home to the 33rd Fighter Wing.

Hurlburt Field: Home of the 1st Special Operations Wing and the 24thSpecial Operations Wing, Hurlburt Field is also where the USAF Special Operations School trains Air Force, Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard and civilian personnel in a variety of courses.

MacDill AFB: This base serves as headquarters for U.S. Central Command and U.S. Special Operations Command, and also is home to the 6th Air Mobility Wing.

Patrick AFB: An Air Force Space Command base, Patrick is home to the 45th Space Wing. it's also responsible for launches of unmanned rockets at nearby Cape Canaveral.

Tyndall AFB: The base operating unit and host wing is the 325th Fighter Wing of the Air Education and Training Command.

Georgia
Moody AFB: The Air Force 23rd Wing, 93rd Air Ground Operations Wing and 820th Base Defense Group are all located at Moody.

Robins AFB: This base is the primary logistics support depot for the C-130, and also is home to the 78th Air Base Wing.

Hawaii
Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam: This joint installation supports both Air Force and Navy missions in the Pacific. It serves as the headquarters for the Pacific Air Forces.

Idaho
Mountain Home AFB: Home of the 366th Fighter Wing and the "Gunfighters," Mountain Home is located between the Danskin and Owyhee Mountains, in southwestern Idaho.

Illinois
Scott AFB: Named for Corporal Frank S. Scott, the first enlisted person to be killed in an aviation crash, this base is home to the 375th Air Mobility Wing.

Kansas
McConnell AFB: The 22nd Air Refueling Wing is based here, which is home to the KC-135 Stratotanker.

Louisiana
Barksdale AFB: Home of the 2nd Bomb Wing, Barksdale is also headquarters of the Air Force Global Strike Command

Maryland
Joint Andrews AFB: Andrews is home to Air Force, Army, Navy and Marine units and hosts a chapter of the Civil Air Patrol. It is under the jurisdiction of the 11th Wing and is the home base of Air Force One.

Massachusetts
Hanscom AFB: This base is the home of the 66th Air Base Group.

Mississippi
Columbus AFB: Columbus is home to the 14th Flying Training Wing, and Air Education and Training Command.

Keesler AFB: The 81st Training Wing of the Air Education and Training Command is based here.

Missouri
Whiteman AFB: The former Sedalia Glider Base, Whiteman is the home of the 509th Bomb Wing, which operates the B-2 stealth bomber aircraft.

Montana
Malmstrom AFB: Home of the 341st Missile Wing, Malmstrom is one of three Air Force bases that maintains and operates the Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile.

Nebraska
Offutt AFB: The host unit at Offutt is the 55th Wing of the Air Combat Command.

Nevada
Nellis AFB: This base is home to the 99th Air Base Wing and the 57th Wing.

New Jersey
Joint Base McGuire–Dix–Lakehurst: This base is the result of the 2010 combination of the Army's Fort Dix, the Navy's Naval Engineering Station Lakehurst and the Air Force's McGuire Air Force Base.

The 87th Air Base Wing is the host wing at this joint base, but it also houses the 305th Air Mobility Wing, the 621st Contingency Response Wing, the 514th Air Mobility Wing of the Air Force Reserve, the 108th Wing of the Air National Guard and the 57th Weapons Squadron.

New Mexico
Cannon AFB: This base is home to the 27th Special Operations Wing.

Holloman AFB: Home to the 49th Wing and the 96th Test Group, squadrons at this base fly the military's only operational fifth generation fighter, the F22A.

North Carolina
Kirtland AFB: Kirtland Air Force Base is a United States Air Force base located in southeast Albuquerque, nestled between the Sandia and Manzano mountain ranges., adjacent to the Albuquerque International Sunport.

Pope AFB: Pope Air Force Base is a United States Air Force base is located on the northern edge of the city of Fayetteville and adjacent to Fort Bragg.

Seymour Johnson AFB: Seymour Johnson Air Force Base is located in the southeast section of Goldsboro, North Carolina in the middle of Wayne County. The base occupies 3,300 acres.

North Dakota
Grand Forks AFB: Grand Forks Air Force Base, land of the Warriors of the North, is a United States Air Force base located in Grand Forks County, 15 miles west of the city of Grand Forks, near the Red River in eastern North Dakota.

Minot AFB: Minot Air Force Base is a U.S. Air Force installation in Ward County, North Dakota. Ten miles of divided highway separate Minot, the base, from Minot, the town, population 37,000.

Ohio
Wright-Patterson AFB: Home of the 88th Air Base Wing, Wright-Patterson also houses the 445th Airlift Wing o f the Air Force Reserve Command.

Oklahoma
Altus AFB: This base is home to the 97th Air Mobility Wing.

Tinker AFB: This Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) logistics complex is home to the 72nd Air Base Wing, the 552nd Air Control Wing, the 38th Cyberspace Engineering Installation Group and the 507th Air Refueling Wing.

Vance AFB: The 71st Flying Training Wing is based at Vance, which is where airmen receive specialized pilot instruction.

South Carolina
Joint Base Charleston: This base, the combination of Naval Support Activity Charleston and Charleston Air Force Base, is home to the 628th Air Base Wing.

Shaw AFB: Shaw Air Force Base is located about 10 miles northwest of downtown Sumter, South Carolina, and within its city limits.

South Dakota
Ellsworth AFB: This base is home to the 28th Bomb Wing of the Air Combat Command (ACC), operating the B-1B Lancer, one of two bases in the Air Force to operate this aircraft.

Tennessee
Arnold AFB: Named for General Henry "Hap" Arnold, this non-flying wing is the home of the Arnold Engineering Development Center, which has one of the largest flight simulation training facilities in the U.S. military.

Texas
Dyess AFB: Part of Global Strike Command, Dyess is home to the 7th Bomb Wing, one of only twoAir Force B-1B Lancer strategic bomber wings.

Goodfellow AFB: Home of the 17th Training Wing, this non-flying base trains members of all branches of the U.S. military in cryptology and intelligence.

Laughlin AFB: The largest of the Air Force's pilot training bases, Laughlin is also home to the 47th Flying Training Wing.

Randolph AFB: This base is part of Joint Base San Antonio, which also includes the Army's Fort Sam Houston, and-and Lackland Air Force Base. Randolph is the home of the 902nd Mission Support Group, and Lackland is the home of the 802nd Mission Support Group, and Air Education and Training Command. This is the processing station for new Air Force recruits entering basic training.

Sheppard AFB: The largest and most diversified training center in Air Education and Training Command, this base is named in honor of Texas Senator John Morris Sheppard, a supporter of military preparations before WWII. The base also is the home of the 82nd Training Wing and the 80th Flying Training Wing.

Utah
Hill AFB: Home of the 75th Air Base Wing and the 388th Fighter Wing of Air Combat Command (ACC), this base was the first operational F-16 base.

Virginia
Joint Base Langley-Eustis (JBLE), the combination of LangleyAir Force Base and the Army's Fort Eustis is the home of the 633rd Air Base Wing.

Washington
Fairchild AFB: This base, under the operational control of the Air Mobility Command, is the home of the 92nd Air Refueling Wing and the 141st Air Refueling Wing of the Washington Air National Guard.

Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM) is the combination of the former McChord Field and the Army's Fort Lewis. It houses the Air Force's 62nd Airlift Wing and the 446th Airlift Wing.

Wyoming
Francis E. Warren AFB: Home of the 90th Missile Wing, this base near Cheyenne is also home to the 20th Air Force, a unit which is responsible for command over all of the Air Force's intercontinental ballistic missiles.

 

 

 

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