Veterans Addiction Help.

A mouse was placed at the top of a jar filled with grains. It was so happy to find so much food around him that no longer he felt the need to run around searching for food. Now he could happily live his life. After a few days of enjoying the grains, he reached the bottom of the jar.
Suddenly, he realize that he was trapped and he couldn’t get out. He now has to fully depend on someone to put grains in the jar for him to survive.
He now has no choice but to eat what he’s given. A slave to his situation.
A few lessons to learn from this:
1) Short term pleasures can lead to long-term traps.
2) If things come easy and you get comfortable, you are getting TRAPPED into dependency.
3) When you are not using your skills, you will lose more than your skills. You lose your CHOICES and FREEDOM.
4) Freedom does not come easy but can be lost quickly. NOTHING comes easily in life and if it comes easily, maybe it is not worth it..
Don’t curse your struggles, embrace them. They are your blessings in disguise.

FREE TRAVEL TO OUR LUXURY REHAB

22 Veterans Per Day Commit Suicide Veterans Treatment Centers.

Four Times as Many Active-Duty and Military Veterans Have Died as a Result of Suicide Rather than Combat
Veterans PTSD Treatment
Military suicides have outpaced the rate among the general U.S. population, but it’s not clear why.

There’s no one reason for it, according to a study released Monday by the Costs of War Project, and the way the Defense Department and VA track suicides might mean even their growing numbers are incomplete.

“The report notes that the increasing rates of suicide for both veterans and active duty personnel are outpacing those of the general population ― an alarming shift, as suicide rates among service members have historically been lower than suicide rates among the general population,” according to a news release.

Per researchers’ estimates, 30,177 Global War on Terror veterans have died by suicide, compared to 7,057 who have died while deployed in support of the Global War on Terror. Statistically, troops are safer in a military uniform than out of it.

ctive-Duty and Military Veterans Have Died as a Result of Suicide Rather than Combat
There are myriad stressors endemic not only to combat deployments but also to military service, that may contribute to the rising suicide rate.

“There are clear contributors to suicidal ideation like high exposure to trauma — mental, physical, moral, and sexual — stress and burnout, the influence of the military’s hegemonic masculine culture, continued access to guns, and the difficulty of reintegrating into civilian life,” according to the report. “In addition to these factors, it is imperative we also consider the impact of the military’s reliance on guiding principles which overburden individual service members with moral responsibility, or blameworthiness for actions or consequences, over which they have little control.”

The report explores a wide variety of factors, some as straightforward as the trauma of combat, but also others, such as advancements in health care that have not only allowed more troops to survive injury, but allowed them to continue to deploy over and over, racking up more physical and mental trauma

“Simultaneously, the length of the war and advances in medical care have allowed service members to redeploy after severe physical trauma,” according to the report. “These compounding traumas contribute to worsening suicide rates as service members deploy and redeploy after sustaining severe injuries.”

And even for those who haven’t been injured, or even seen a firefight, the constant fear of IEDs is enough to seed post-traumatic stress that can be more and more of a problem down the line.

But deadly deployments are still not a satisfactory explanation, according to the report. Combat deaths have been falling steadily since 2007, the study notes, as suicide rates have continued to rise.

Four Times as Many Active-Duty and Military Veterans Have Died as a Result of Suicide Rather than Combat
And numbers of troops deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan have dwindled from hundreds of thousands to just a few thousand troops, the DoD reported some of its highest suicide rates in 2018, 2019 and 2020.

There’s also the general demands of military life to consider, from long hours and separations from families to, notably, the prevalence of sexual trauma.

There’s also a culture that values pushing distress aside in service of the group, putting the mission above any one person’s needs,despite a decade of ever-increasing research, support and an attempt to de-stigmatize struggles with mental health.

“Military life is exhausting, and the high operational tempo limits time for reflection,” according to the report. “Further, the dominant masculine identity that pervades the military is one that overwhelmingly favors machismo and toughness. Asking for help during trauma or suicidal ideation, then, is necessarily at odds with military culture; ‘acknowledging mental illness is likely to be viewed as a sign of weakness and a potential threat to their careers.’ “

Even so, there is a disconnect somewhere, between currently serving troops and veterans.

DoD data shows that the majority of active-duty suicides are carried out by service members who have never deployed. Suicides among veterans, however, are much more common for those with combat experience.

It’s possible, then, that the snowballing effects of post-traumatic stress and traumatic brain injuries ― two key risk factors for suicide ― might not come to a head until after a service member has separated, when their sense of belonging and mission gives way to a search for a new identity, where many feel isolated from their civilian friends and family.

“The VA 2020 National Veteran Suicide Prevention Annual Report reveals the suicide rate of veterans overall and adjusted for age and sex is 1.5 times that of the general population,” according to the report. “This rate is likely a conservative one because, unlike earlier reports, the VA only counts veterans who were federally activated, leaving out reservists and National Guardsmen who were not federally activated.”

Similarly, DoD’s numbers may be off for active-duty suicides, “by as much as half,” according to the report, because of the way it investigates and determines whether a death is a suicide.

“For example, the DoD may not count overdoses, single-vehicle wrecks, weapon misfires, and the like as completed suicides; reconstructing a narrative of suicide is prone to error,” according to the report.

While the Defeat ISIS mission will continue in Iraq, the end of the war in Afghanistan might give the the services a chance to reset and reevaluate.

“The military needs to promote help-seeking attitudes and frame them positively,” according to the report. “Accordingly, medical screenings for PTSD, TBIs, depression and suicidal ideation must be universal, communicated across all channels, and taken seriously. That polytraumas and repeated TBIs are so commonplace should motivate changes in if and how service members are redeployed.”

And lastly, some form of reintegration into civilian society is a must, programs like “Operation Phoenix” provided by greyteam.org in Boca Raton, Florida are proving this to be an invaluable tool in the war on suicide.

Free travel to our location using Veterans Choice, VA Mission Act and Veterans Community care
Veterans Addiction Treatment

PTSD and Substance Use Disorders Are a Vicious Cycle for Veterans

Veterans Addiction Treatment

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is not a military or civilian issue, but rather a human issue. PTSD is a natural response to a traumatic event that people cannot process and cope with.

Although PTSD tends to affect military and veterans at higher levels of breadth and depth than their civilian counterparts, this is not due to a flaw or weakness among service members. Rather, increased rates of PTSD are associated with increased levels of exposure to potentially traumatic events, or PTEs.

Over the past two decades of war, individuals’ combat tours became more frequent and longer in duration, which has the potential to increase service members’ exposure to PTEs, and this has naturally and expectedly taken its toll on the mental health of America’s active-duty and veteran communities.

As service members transition out of uniform, most experience additional transitional stress as they leave the military culture and learn to adapt to the norms and expectations of the civilian world. Many also report difficulties adjusting to family life after prolonged separation and especially after experiencing significant trauma.

Returning service members must overcome deeply held societal stigmas in seeking mental health care, both in processing their feelings (for example, the belief that what they are feeling is a sign of weakness) and their perceptions that others may perceive them as weak (for example, the belief that peers will view them as weak). Service members must also navigate a new and unfamiliar mental health care system. In many cases, those hurdles may feel insurmountable and, without care, their symptoms become worse.

Despite progress in recent years, lack of access to quality behavioral health care, combined with the stigma many service members feel when asking for help, leads many to seek more immediate and readily available methods of coping. Unfortunately, one of the most readily available is the use of substances, like alcohol or marijuana.

That may seem foreign, but let us challenge this perception. Why do we find it more acceptable for someone to purchase alcohol than to seek out mental health care? Think about it: When was the last time you noticed someone purchasing alcohol at the grocery store? When individuals go to a mental health appointment, they may feel like they are on display in the waiting room — especially veterans, who tend to get care at facilities that loudly announce they are providing mental health treatment.

That sense of being on display may not be present when purchasing alcohol. Self-medication typically creates a downward spiral as the abuse of alcohol and drugs leads to more negative feelings and increased levels of tolerance, which require higher dosages to achieve desired effects.

Alcohol is not the only substance used by veterans and civilians. However, alcohol is the most readily available and the most likely to be abused.

It is not uncommon to see a co-occurrence of PTSD and heavy use of substances, which can rise to the level of a substance use disorder, or SUD, when a person’s functioning is impaired. Studies have shown that 46% percent of individuals with lifetime PTSD also met criteria for SUD. A substantial number of veterans with PTSD have met the diagnostic criteria for SUD at some point. Similar findings may be seen in civilians who have survived traumatic events, such as natural disasters.

By labeling PTSD and SUD as co-occurring, it may appear that these two diagnoses are isolated and acting separately within an individual. The truth is that they are often intertwined and, while PTSD may have brought about SUD (or vice-versa), trying to separate PTSD from SUD is quite difficult.

Our recent partnered research study demonstrated that these conditions cannot be separated as they both simultaneously affect the functioning of the individual, family and society. Based on these findings, our position is that PTSD and SUD need to be addressed simultaneously. This is a significant departure from the norm, as most PTSD treatment centers require patients to be drug-free prior to admission. While some individuals may require acute care, such as detox, for their substance use, the goal of treatment should be to impact both sets of symptoms. We believe when SUD and PTSD are treated in series, instead of simultaneously, symptoms of both may increase.

Simultaneously treating PTSD and SUD is a challenge, especially within the traditional behavioral health landscape that isolates and separately treats the two conditions. The majority of SUD treatment facilities are separate from PTSD treatment programs. When both are offered, they typically exist in separate tracks that are completely independent of one another. The goal for treatment should be to address underlying causes, not merely symptoms, and when you begin addressing trauma during treatment, traumatic memories may worsen for some time, which may also increase the use of substances for self-medicating/soothing. This may also impact completion rates and the number of relapses.

Our work demonstrates that separating treatment for these two conditions not only impacts the delivery of treatment and functioning but makes an already complicated mental health resource landscape even more complex and challenging for veterans to navigate. It may be necessary to challenge how the needs of veterans are addressed to remove barriers to care that make treating these co-occurring disorders simultaneously so difficult.

PTSD Myths Persist in the Military Community, New Survey Finds

A poll of 2,000 Americans has found that members of the military community — active-duty personnel, veterans and their family members — are twice as likely than civilians to believe persons with post-traumatic stress disorder are violent or dangerous.

And 35% of these “military-connected” individuals believe that PTSD is not treatable, another finding that professionals who treat trauma-related mental health issues find disheartening, said Anthony Hassan, president of the not-for-profit Cohen Veterans Network.

“I was shocked at these percentages and then my mood went to disappointment,” Hassan said. “I spent so much time in the military working on reducing stigma and educating our members to make sure they understood these diagnoses and that getting help wouldn’t hurt their careers. Clearly we are not making much improvement.”

Hassan and other organizations that help service members and veterans want them to know that PTSD can be treated, an apt message to share for PTSD Awareness Month in June.

“PTSD’s impact on mental health still hasn’t hit mainstream understanding,” said Teralyn Sell, a Wisconsin-based psychotherapist. “There are evidence-based trauma treatments that are available.”

According to the survey of 2,000 people conducted by The Harris Poll, 67% of Americans believe that most veterans have PTSD. Some 74% think most combat vets have PTSD. One in four believe patients with PTSD are violent or dangerous, and nearly 60% believe that if a person experiences a traumatic event, they will develop PTSD.

In reality, however, studies show that between 13.5% and 20% of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans meet the criteria for a PTSD diagnosis, as do 12% of Gulf War veterans and 15% of Vietnam veterans.

But the majority of those people do not engage in violence, according the the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Two surveys in 2014 of U.S. military personnel and veterans diagnosed with PTSD found that 9% engaged in severe violence and 25% were involved in physical aggression in the prior year.

But alcohol misuse, younger age, financial instability, combat exposure and a history of violence before military service appeared to contribute to severe violence and aggression.

Veterans with PTSD who did not abuse alcohol were not at significantly higher risk of violence, data showed.

“PTSD is associated with an increased risk of violence,” VA researchers have said. “[But] the majority of veterans and non-veterans with PTSD have never engaged in violence. When other factors like alcohol and drug misuse, additional psychiatric disorders, or younger age are considered, the association between PTSD and violence is decreased.”

Hassan said he thinks perhaps military people think those with PTSD are violent because they hear about colleagues being booted from service for an incident, and if the colleague also has a PTSD diagnosis, they associate the condition with the violence.

He added that service members may believe the condition is not treatable because they know fellow veterans who have a diagnosis and receive disability compensation for their condition, and then don’t get treatment or actively engage in it out of concern they will lose their benefits.

“I don’t know how [service members] get stuck on it, how they seem to relate PTSD with violence and reckless behavior, and how they make this assumption that treatment doesn’t work when they’re told in the military all the time that these aren’t true,” Hassan said.

According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, effective PTSD treatments include: prolonged exposure therapy, which has a patient confronting the trauma openly and working to tackle situations that have been avoided as a result; cognitive processing therapy, in which a therapist works with the patient to overcome negative thoughts through self-awareness and activities; and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing — a therapy during which a patient tracks a provider’s quick movements or other stimulus while thinking about a traumatic event or experiences.

The science also is evolving for PTSD. A stellate ganglion block — an injection of an anesthetic into nerves at the base of the neck –reduced PTSD symptoms in 70% of combat veterans who received it in one study. Providers are using ketamine infusions to treat chronic forms of the disorder. And most recently, a study using MDMA, or Ecstasy, when coupled with therapy, showed promise for treating the disorder.

Misconceptions of PTSD, the people who have it and its treatments can deter people from getting care, which can cause lifelong suffering, Hassan said.

Treatment can lead to a “more productive life,” he added.

“Untreated, your life can be unmanageable. People who go for treatment can improve their quality of their life, they can regain pre-crisis or pre-diagnosis functioning and they improve their relationships, at work, at home and with family and friends,” he said.

With the pandemic winding down in the U.S. Hassan said he has concerns for service members and veterans with the diagnosis who have suffered in the past year.

According to the survey, 65% of Americans with PTSD said that the past year, including isolation resulting from the pandemic, the politically charged climate in the U.S. and civil unrest has negatively affected their recovery.

“I want to remind people that if you come and get help, we really can help you improve your quality of life, there’s no doubt about it,” Hassan said.

Options for seeking treatment in the military include contacting Military One Source at 1-800-342-9647 for guidance on where to seek further treatment, contacting a primary care provider or reaching to behavioral health providers at military clinics and hospitals or, depending on the unit, consulting with an embedded behavioral health team.

Veterans have access to mental health treatment at the VA for at least one year after they leave active duty. They also can seek assistance at a local VA medical center or Vet Center, their primary care provider or community specialists.

The Cohen Veterans Network announced earlier this year that it also has started offering treatment to active-duty personnel at most of their 19 locations with a referral from Tricare.

“Getting help today is certainly for a better tomorrow,” Hassan said.

— Patricia Kime can be reached at Patricia.Kime@Monster.com. Follow her on Twitter @patriciakime

Substance Abuse Treatment Military & Veterans West Virginia

Why Veterans Turn to Drugs and Alcohol
Many men and women who are serving or have served in the United States military struggle with addiction.

Veterans who have seen combat may have co-occurring disorders, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, in addition to an addiction.

Traumatic events such as combat exposure and multiple deployments can trigger drug or alcohol use, which all too often lead to addiction.

If a veteran you love is struggling with a drug or alcohol use problem, contact a treatment provider for help finding the right treatment program.

Veterans and PTSD
Many veterans suffering from an addiction have co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Once referred to as “shellshock” and later “battle fatigue,” PTSD can be caused by witnessing warfare or other significantly tragic or startling events.

Although most cases of PTSD are caused by combat, veterans may also develop the disorder after sexual abuse — about 23 percent of female veterans have reported being sexually assaulted during their time in the military.

Some symptoms of PTSD include:

Flashbacks
Memory problems
Low sense of self-worth
Hopelessness
Trouble sleeping
Relationship problems
Aggression
Trouble concentrating
Self-destructive behavior (self-harm or substance abuse)
These symptoms may be triggered by anything that is a reminder of the traumatic incident. Many veterans turn to substance abuse to self-medicate and numb their pain.

More than 20 percent of veterans with PTSD also suffer from an addiction or dependence on drugs or alcohol.

People with PTSD have a harder time overcoming addiction than those without it. The symptoms of withdrawal combined with the symptoms of PTSD amplify negative feelings and emotions that may lead to a relapse.

Addiction treatment programs that focus on PTSD and addiction simultaneously are most successful for veterans.

Addiction to Prescription Medications
Veterans with PTSD are often prescribed anxiety medications, most of which are highly addictive. To curb the risk of addiction, some doctors prescribe non-addictive antidepressant medications such as Paxil or Zoloft. Even veterans without PTSD can become addicted to painkillers prescribed for combat-related injuries.

Common addictive medications prescribed to veterans include:

Painkillers (Lortab, Vicodin, OxyContin)
Benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Xanax)
Sedatives (Ambien, Lunesta)
Veterans taking these drugs may develop a dependence on them, meaning a tolerance to their effects and symptoms of withdrawal when quitting. As time goes on, veterans may spiral into full-blown addiction, which is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior.

In an attempt to mitigate drug abuse among service members and veterans, some advocates are pushing for tighter regulations on how long addictive medications can be prescribed.

Alcohol and Illicit Drugs in the Military
Few service members risk using illicit drugs in the military because it can result in a dishonorable discharge. Drinking, however, is an ingrained part of the military culture that often carries on into civilian life. All too often, veterans and service members self-medicating with alcohol succumb to an addiction.

Approximately 20 percent of service members reported binge drinking at least once a week. This rate is even higher for those with combat exposure.

Some veterans addicted to prescriptions for pain and PTSD turn to illicit substances. Illicit drugs like heroin are often cheaper and easier to obtain than prescription painkillers.

Some veterans prefer to avoid the VA when looking for any type of medical care because it can take much longer to get treatment. In cases of serious PTSD and/or addiction, getting immediate treatment is essential and seeking treatment outside the VA can be beneficial. There are many qualified treatment centers for addicted veterans with underlying PTSD.

If you’re a veteran struggling with an addiction, California Palms will assist you getting qualified to use VA Community Care or the Veterans Mission Act to cover your costs. We fly Veterans from all over the United States to our luxury rehab in Ohio.

Substance Abuse Treatment Military & Veterans Michigan

Why Veterans Turn to Drugs and Alcohol
Many men and women who are serving or have served in the United States military struggle with addiction.

Veterans who have seen combat may have co-occurring disorders, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, in addition to an addiction.

Traumatic events such as combat exposure and multiple deployments can trigger drug or alcohol use, which all too often lead to addiction.

If a veteran you love is struggling with a drug or alcohol use problem, contact a treatment provider for help finding the right treatment program.

Veterans and PTSD
Many veterans suffering from an addiction have co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Once referred to as “shellshock” and later “battle fatigue,” PTSD can be caused by witnessing warfare or other significantly tragic or startling events.

Although most cases of PTSD are caused by combat, veterans may also develop the disorder after sexual abuse — about 23 percent of female veterans have reported being sexually assaulted during their time in the military.

Some symptoms of PTSD include:

Flashbacks
Memory problems
Low sense of self-worth
Hopelessness
Trouble sleeping
Relationship problems
Aggression
Trouble concentrating
Self-destructive behavior (self-harm or substance abuse)
These symptoms may be triggered by anything that is a reminder of the traumatic incident. Many veterans turn to substance abuse to self-medicate and numb their pain.

More than 20 percent of veterans with PTSD also suffer from an addiction or dependence on drugs or alcohol.

People with PTSD have a harder time overcoming addiction than those without it. The symptoms of withdrawal combined with the symptoms of PTSD amplify negative feelings and emotions that may lead to a relapse.

Addiction treatment programs that focus on PTSD and addiction simultaneously are most successful for veterans.

Addiction to Prescription Medications
Veterans with PTSD are often prescribed anxiety medications, most of which are highly addictive. To curb the risk of addiction, some doctors prescribe non-addictive antidepressant medications such as Paxil or Zoloft. Even veterans without PTSD can become addicted to painkillers prescribed for combat-related injuries.

Common addictive medications prescribed to veterans include:

Painkillers (Lortab, Vicodin, OxyContin)
Benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Xanax)
Sedatives (Ambien, Lunesta)
Veterans taking these drugs may develop a dependence on them, meaning a tolerance to their effects and symptoms of withdrawal when quitting. As time goes on, veterans may spiral into full-blown addiction, which is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior.

In an attempt to mitigate drug abuse among service members and veterans, some advocates are pushing for tighter regulations on how long addictive medications can be prescribed.

Alcohol and Illicit Drugs in the Military
Few service members risk using illicit drugs in the military because it can result in a dishonorable discharge. Drinking, however, is an ingrained part of the military culture that often carries on into civilian life. All too often, veterans and service members self-medicating with alcohol succumb to an addiction.

Approximately 20 percent of service members reported binge drinking at least once a week. This rate is even higher for those with combat exposure.

Some veterans addicted to prescriptions for pain and PTSD turn to illicit substances. Illicit drugs like heroin are often cheaper and easier to obtain than prescription painkillers.

Some veterans prefer to avoid the VA when looking for any type of medical care because it can take much longer to get treatment. In cases of serious PTSD and/or addiction, getting immediate treatment is essential and seeking treatment outside the VA can be beneficial. There are many qualified treatment centers for addicted veterans with underlying PTSD.

If you’re a veteran struggling with an addiction, California Palms will assist you getting qualified to use VA Community Care or the Veterans Mission Act to cover your costs. We fly Veterans from all over the United States to our luxury rehab in Ohio.

Substance Abuse Treatment Military & Veterans Ohio

Why Veterans Turn to Drugs and Alcohol
Many men and women who are serving or have served in the United States military struggle with addiction.

Veterans who have seen combat may have co-occurring disorders, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, in addition to an addiction.

Traumatic events such as combat exposure and multiple deployments can trigger drug or alcohol use, which all too often lead to addiction.

If a veteran you love is struggling with a drug or alcohol use problem, contact a treatment provider for help finding the right treatment program.

Veterans and PTSD
Many veterans suffering from an addiction have co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Once referred to as “shellshock” and later “battle fatigue,” PTSD can be caused by witnessing warfare or other significantly tragic or startling events.

Although most cases of PTSD are caused by combat, veterans may also develop the disorder after sexual abuse — about 23 percent of female veterans have reported being sexually assaulted during their time in the military.

Some symptoms of PTSD include:

Flashbacks
Memory problems
Low sense of self-worth
Hopelessness
Trouble sleeping
Relationship problems
Aggression
Trouble concentrating
Self-destructive behavior (self-harm or substance abuse)
These symptoms may be triggered by anything that is a reminder of the traumatic incident. Many veterans turn to substance abuse to self-medicate and numb their pain.

More than 20 percent of veterans with PTSD also suffer from an addiction or dependence on drugs or alcohol.

People with PTSD have a harder time overcoming addiction than those without it. The symptoms of withdrawal combined with the symptoms of PTSD amplify negative feelings and emotions that may lead to a relapse.

Addiction treatment programs that focus on PTSD and addiction simultaneously are most successful for veterans.

Addiction to Prescription Medications
Veterans with PTSD are often prescribed anxiety medications, most of which are highly addictive. To curb the risk of addiction, some doctors prescribe non-addictive antidepressant medications such as Paxil or Zoloft. Even veterans without PTSD can become addicted to painkillers prescribed for combat-related injuries.

Common addictive medications prescribed to veterans include:

Painkillers (Lortab, Vicodin, OxyContin)
Benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Xanax)
Sedatives (Ambien, Lunesta)
Veterans taking these drugs may develop a dependence on them, meaning a tolerance to their effects and symptoms of withdrawal when quitting. As time goes on, veterans may spiral into full-blown addiction, which is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior.

In an attempt to mitigate drug abuse among service members and veterans, some advocates are pushing for tighter regulations on how long addictive medications can be prescribed.

Alcohol and Illicit Drugs in the Military
Few service members risk using illicit drugs in the military because it can result in a dishonorable discharge. Drinking, however, is an ingrained part of the military culture that often carries on into civilian life. All too often, veterans and service members self-medicating with alcohol succumb to an addiction.

Approximately 20 percent of service members reported binge drinking at least once a week. This rate is even higher for those with combat exposure.

Some veterans addicted to prescriptions for pain and PTSD turn to illicit substances. Illicit drugs like heroin are often cheaper and easier to obtain than prescription painkillers.

Some veterans prefer to avoid the VA when looking for any type of medical care because it can take much longer to get treatment. In cases of serious PTSD and/or addiction, getting immediate treatment is essential and seeking treatment outside the VA can be beneficial. There are many qualified treatment centers for addicted veterans with underlying PTSD.

If you’re a veteran struggling with an addiction, California Palms will assist you getting qualified to use VA Community Care or the Veterans Mission Act to cover your costs. We fly Veterans from all over the United States to our luxury rehab in Ohio.

Substance Abuse Treatment Military & Veterans

Why Veterans Turn to Drugs and Alcohol
Many men and women who are serving or have served in the United States military struggle with addiction.

Veterans who have seen combat may have co-occurring disorders, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, in addition to an addiction.

Traumatic events such as combat exposure and multiple deployments can trigger drug or alcohol use, which all too often lead to addiction.

If a veteran you love is struggling with a drug or alcohol use problem, contact a treatment provider for help finding the right treatment program.

Veterans and PTSD
Many veterans suffering from an addiction have co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Once referred to as “shellshock” and later “battle fatigue,” PTSD can be caused by witnessing warfare or other significantly tragic or startling events.

Although most cases of PTSD are caused by combat, veterans may also develop the disorder after sexual abuse — about 23 percent of female veterans have reported being sexually assaulted during their time in the military.

Some symptoms of PTSD include:

Flashbacks
Memory problems
Low sense of self-worth
Hopelessness
Trouble sleeping
Relationship problems
Aggression
Trouble concentrating
Self-destructive behavior (self-harm or substance abuse)
These symptoms may be triggered by anything that is a reminder of the traumatic incident. Many veterans turn to substance abuse to self-medicate and numb their pain.

More than 20 percent of veterans with PTSD also suffer from an addiction or dependence on drugs or alcohol.

People with PTSD have a harder time overcoming addiction than those without it. The symptoms of withdrawal combined with the symptoms of PTSD amplify negative feelings and emotions that may lead to a relapse.

Addiction treatment programs that focus on PTSD and addiction simultaneously are most successful for veterans.

Addiction to Prescription Medications
Veterans with PTSD are often prescribed anxiety medications, most of which are highly addictive. To curb the risk of addiction, some doctors prescribe non-addictive antidepressant medications such as Paxil or Zoloft. Even veterans without PTSD can become addicted to painkillers prescribed for combat-related injuries.

Common addictive medications prescribed to veterans include:

Painkillers (Lortab, Vicodin, OxyContin)
Benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Xanax)
Sedatives (Ambien, Lunesta)
Veterans taking these drugs may develop a dependence on them, meaning a tolerance to their effects and symptoms of withdrawal when quitting. As time goes on, veterans may spiral into full-blown addiction, which is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior.

In an attempt to mitigate drug abuse among service members and veterans, some advocates are pushing for tighter regulations on how long addictive medications can be prescribed.

Alcohol and Illicit Drugs in the Military
Few service members risk using illicit drugs in the military because it can result in a dishonorable discharge. Drinking, however, is an ingrained part of the military culture that often carries on into civilian life. All too often, veterans and service members self-medicating with alcohol succumb to an addiction.

Approximately 20 percent of service members reported binge drinking at least once a week. This rate is even higher for those with combat exposure.

Some veterans addicted to prescriptions for pain and PTSD turn to illicit substances. Illicit drugs like heroin are often cheaper and easier to obtain than prescription painkillers.

Some veterans prefer to avoid the VA when looking for any type of medical care because it can take much longer to get treatment. In cases of serious PTSD and/or addiction, getting immediate treatment is essential and seeking treatment outside the VA can be beneficial. There are many qualified treatment centers for addicted veterans with underlying PTSD.

If you’re a veteran struggling with an addiction, California Palms will assist you getting qualified to use VA Community Care or the Veterans Mission Act to cover your costs. We fly Veterans from all over the United States to our luxury rehab in Ohio.

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs Alabama

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs Alabama . Female Veterans Residential Drug & Alcohol Treatment Alabama . California Palms is a Veterans only drug and alcohol addiction treatment center. We offer private luxury drug and alcohol rehabilitation to our female / women military veterans. Our luxury rehab offers private rooms, veterans recovery game room and more. We know that our nations female veterans suffer from the same substance abuse programs as there male counterparts. At California Palms our female veterans get to enjoy the fact that they have a women for your drug, alcohol or PTSD treatment.

TRAVEL COVERED THRU VA COMMUNITY CARE, VA CHOICE PROGRAM AND OTHER SORCES FROM Alabama to our Ohio location

Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment
Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs. Female Veterans Residential Drug & Alcohol Treatment. California Palms is a Veterans only drug and alcohol addiction treatment center. We offer private luxury drug and alcohol rehabilitation to our female / women military veterans. Our luxury rehab offers private rooms, veterans recovery game room and more. We know that our nations female veterans suffer from the same substance abuse programs as there male counterparts. At California Palms our female veterans get to enjoy the fact that they have a women for your drug, alcohol or PTSD treatment.

Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment
Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment