Veterans Addiction Help.

A mouse was placed at the top of a jar filled with grains. It was so happy to find so much food around him that no longer he felt the need to run around searching for food. Now he could happily live his life. After a few days of enjoying the grains, he reached the bottom of the jar.
Suddenly, he realize that he was trapped and he couldn’t get out. He now has to fully depend on someone to put grains in the jar for him to survive.
He now has no choice but to eat what he’s given. A slave to his situation.
A few lessons to learn from this:
1) Short term pleasures can lead to long-term traps.
2) If things come easy and you get comfortable, you are getting TRAPPED into dependency.
3) When you are not using your skills, you will lose more than your skills. You lose your CHOICES and FREEDOM.
4) Freedom does not come easy but can be lost quickly. NOTHING comes easily in life and if it comes easily, maybe it is not worth it..
Don’t curse your struggles, embrace them. They are your blessings in disguise.

FREE TRAVEL TO OUR LUXURY REHAB

PTSD Myths Persist in the Military Community, New Survey Finds

A poll of 2,000 Americans has found that members of the military community — active-duty personnel, veterans and their family members — are twice as likely than civilians to believe persons with post-traumatic stress disorder are violent or dangerous.

And 35% of these “military-connected” individuals believe that PTSD is not treatable, another finding that professionals who treat trauma-related mental health issues find disheartening, said Anthony Hassan, president of the not-for-profit Cohen Veterans Network.

“I was shocked at these percentages and then my mood went to disappointment,” Hassan said. “I spent so much time in the military working on reducing stigma and educating our members to make sure they understood these diagnoses and that getting help wouldn’t hurt their careers. Clearly we are not making much improvement.”

Hassan and other organizations that help service members and veterans want them to know that PTSD can be treated, an apt message to share for PTSD Awareness Month in June.

“PTSD’s impact on mental health still hasn’t hit mainstream understanding,” said Teralyn Sell, a Wisconsin-based psychotherapist. “There are evidence-based trauma treatments that are available.”

According to the survey of 2,000 people conducted by The Harris Poll, 67% of Americans believe that most veterans have PTSD. Some 74% think most combat vets have PTSD. One in four believe patients with PTSD are violent or dangerous, and nearly 60% believe that if a person experiences a traumatic event, they will develop PTSD.

In reality, however, studies show that between 13.5% and 20% of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans meet the criteria for a PTSD diagnosis, as do 12% of Gulf War veterans and 15% of Vietnam veterans.

But the majority of those people do not engage in violence, according the the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Two surveys in 2014 of U.S. military personnel and veterans diagnosed with PTSD found that 9% engaged in severe violence and 25% were involved in physical aggression in the prior year.

But alcohol misuse, younger age, financial instability, combat exposure and a history of violence before military service appeared to contribute to severe violence and aggression.

Veterans with PTSD who did not abuse alcohol were not at significantly higher risk of violence, data showed.

“PTSD is associated with an increased risk of violence,” VA researchers have said. “[But] the majority of veterans and non-veterans with PTSD have never engaged in violence. When other factors like alcohol and drug misuse, additional psychiatric disorders, or younger age are considered, the association between PTSD and violence is decreased.”

Hassan said he thinks perhaps military people think those with PTSD are violent because they hear about colleagues being booted from service for an incident, and if the colleague also has a PTSD diagnosis, they associate the condition with the violence.

He added that service members may believe the condition is not treatable because they know fellow veterans who have a diagnosis and receive disability compensation for their condition, and then don’t get treatment or actively engage in it out of concern they will lose their benefits.

“I don’t know how [service members] get stuck on it, how they seem to relate PTSD with violence and reckless behavior, and how they make this assumption that treatment doesn’t work when they’re told in the military all the time that these aren’t true,” Hassan said.

According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, effective PTSD treatments include: prolonged exposure therapy, which has a patient confronting the trauma openly and working to tackle situations that have been avoided as a result; cognitive processing therapy, in which a therapist works with the patient to overcome negative thoughts through self-awareness and activities; and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing — a therapy during which a patient tracks a provider’s quick movements or other stimulus while thinking about a traumatic event or experiences.

The science also is evolving for PTSD. A stellate ganglion block — an injection of an anesthetic into nerves at the base of the neck –reduced PTSD symptoms in 70% of combat veterans who received it in one study. Providers are using ketamine infusions to treat chronic forms of the disorder. And most recently, a study using MDMA, or Ecstasy, when coupled with therapy, showed promise for treating the disorder.

Misconceptions of PTSD, the people who have it and its treatments can deter people from getting care, which can cause lifelong suffering, Hassan said.

Treatment can lead to a “more productive life,” he added.

“Untreated, your life can be unmanageable. People who go for treatment can improve their quality of their life, they can regain pre-crisis or pre-diagnosis functioning and they improve their relationships, at work, at home and with family and friends,” he said.

With the pandemic winding down in the U.S. Hassan said he has concerns for service members and veterans with the diagnosis who have suffered in the past year.

According to the survey, 65% of Americans with PTSD said that the past year, including isolation resulting from the pandemic, the politically charged climate in the U.S. and civil unrest has negatively affected their recovery.

“I want to remind people that if you come and get help, we really can help you improve your quality of life, there’s no doubt about it,” Hassan said.

Options for seeking treatment in the military include contacting Military One Source at 1-800-342-9647 for guidance on where to seek further treatment, contacting a primary care provider or reaching to behavioral health providers at military clinics and hospitals or, depending on the unit, consulting with an embedded behavioral health team.

Veterans have access to mental health treatment at the VA for at least one year after they leave active duty. They also can seek assistance at a local VA medical center or Vet Center, their primary care provider or community specialists.

The Cohen Veterans Network announced earlier this year that it also has started offering treatment to active-duty personnel at most of their 19 locations with a referral from Tricare.

“Getting help today is certainly for a better tomorrow,” Hassan said.

— Patricia Kime can be reached at Patricia.Kime@Monster.com. Follow her on Twitter @patriciakime

Substance Abuse Treatment Military & Veterans West Virginia

Why Veterans Turn to Drugs and Alcohol
Many men and women who are serving or have served in the United States military struggle with addiction.

Veterans who have seen combat may have co-occurring disorders, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, in addition to an addiction.

Traumatic events such as combat exposure and multiple deployments can trigger drug or alcohol use, which all too often lead to addiction.

If a veteran you love is struggling with a drug or alcohol use problem, contact a treatment provider for help finding the right treatment program.

Veterans and PTSD
Many veterans suffering from an addiction have co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Once referred to as “shellshock” and later “battle fatigue,” PTSD can be caused by witnessing warfare or other significantly tragic or startling events.

Although most cases of PTSD are caused by combat, veterans may also develop the disorder after sexual abuse — about 23 percent of female veterans have reported being sexually assaulted during their time in the military.

Some symptoms of PTSD include:

Flashbacks
Memory problems
Low sense of self-worth
Hopelessness
Trouble sleeping
Relationship problems
Aggression
Trouble concentrating
Self-destructive behavior (self-harm or substance abuse)
These symptoms may be triggered by anything that is a reminder of the traumatic incident. Many veterans turn to substance abuse to self-medicate and numb their pain.

More than 20 percent of veterans with PTSD also suffer from an addiction or dependence on drugs or alcohol.

People with PTSD have a harder time overcoming addiction than those without it. The symptoms of withdrawal combined with the symptoms of PTSD amplify negative feelings and emotions that may lead to a relapse.

Addiction treatment programs that focus on PTSD and addiction simultaneously are most successful for veterans.

Addiction to Prescription Medications
Veterans with PTSD are often prescribed anxiety medications, most of which are highly addictive. To curb the risk of addiction, some doctors prescribe non-addictive antidepressant medications such as Paxil or Zoloft. Even veterans without PTSD can become addicted to painkillers prescribed for combat-related injuries.

Common addictive medications prescribed to veterans include:

Painkillers (Lortab, Vicodin, OxyContin)
Benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Xanax)
Sedatives (Ambien, Lunesta)
Veterans taking these drugs may develop a dependence on them, meaning a tolerance to their effects and symptoms of withdrawal when quitting. As time goes on, veterans may spiral into full-blown addiction, which is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior.

In an attempt to mitigate drug abuse among service members and veterans, some advocates are pushing for tighter regulations on how long addictive medications can be prescribed.

Alcohol and Illicit Drugs in the Military
Few service members risk using illicit drugs in the military because it can result in a dishonorable discharge. Drinking, however, is an ingrained part of the military culture that often carries on into civilian life. All too often, veterans and service members self-medicating with alcohol succumb to an addiction.

Approximately 20 percent of service members reported binge drinking at least once a week. This rate is even higher for those with combat exposure.

Some veterans addicted to prescriptions for pain and PTSD turn to illicit substances. Illicit drugs like heroin are often cheaper and easier to obtain than prescription painkillers.

Some veterans prefer to avoid the VA when looking for any type of medical care because it can take much longer to get treatment. In cases of serious PTSD and/or addiction, getting immediate treatment is essential and seeking treatment outside the VA can be beneficial. There are many qualified treatment centers for addicted veterans with underlying PTSD.

If you’re a veteran struggling with an addiction, California Palms will assist you getting qualified to use VA Community Care or the Veterans Mission Act to cover your costs. We fly Veterans from all over the United States to our luxury rehab in Ohio.

Substance Abuse Treatment Military & Veterans Michigan

Why Veterans Turn to Drugs and Alcohol
Many men and women who are serving or have served in the United States military struggle with addiction.

Veterans who have seen combat may have co-occurring disorders, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, in addition to an addiction.

Traumatic events such as combat exposure and multiple deployments can trigger drug or alcohol use, which all too often lead to addiction.

If a veteran you love is struggling with a drug or alcohol use problem, contact a treatment provider for help finding the right treatment program.

Veterans and PTSD
Many veterans suffering from an addiction have co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Once referred to as “shellshock” and later “battle fatigue,” PTSD can be caused by witnessing warfare or other significantly tragic or startling events.

Although most cases of PTSD are caused by combat, veterans may also develop the disorder after sexual abuse — about 23 percent of female veterans have reported being sexually assaulted during their time in the military.

Some symptoms of PTSD include:

Flashbacks
Memory problems
Low sense of self-worth
Hopelessness
Trouble sleeping
Relationship problems
Aggression
Trouble concentrating
Self-destructive behavior (self-harm or substance abuse)
These symptoms may be triggered by anything that is a reminder of the traumatic incident. Many veterans turn to substance abuse to self-medicate and numb their pain.

More than 20 percent of veterans with PTSD also suffer from an addiction or dependence on drugs or alcohol.

People with PTSD have a harder time overcoming addiction than those without it. The symptoms of withdrawal combined with the symptoms of PTSD amplify negative feelings and emotions that may lead to a relapse.

Addiction treatment programs that focus on PTSD and addiction simultaneously are most successful for veterans.

Addiction to Prescription Medications
Veterans with PTSD are often prescribed anxiety medications, most of which are highly addictive. To curb the risk of addiction, some doctors prescribe non-addictive antidepressant medications such as Paxil or Zoloft. Even veterans without PTSD can become addicted to painkillers prescribed for combat-related injuries.

Common addictive medications prescribed to veterans include:

Painkillers (Lortab, Vicodin, OxyContin)
Benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Xanax)
Sedatives (Ambien, Lunesta)
Veterans taking these drugs may develop a dependence on them, meaning a tolerance to their effects and symptoms of withdrawal when quitting. As time goes on, veterans may spiral into full-blown addiction, which is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior.

In an attempt to mitigate drug abuse among service members and veterans, some advocates are pushing for tighter regulations on how long addictive medications can be prescribed.

Alcohol and Illicit Drugs in the Military
Few service members risk using illicit drugs in the military because it can result in a dishonorable discharge. Drinking, however, is an ingrained part of the military culture that often carries on into civilian life. All too often, veterans and service members self-medicating with alcohol succumb to an addiction.

Approximately 20 percent of service members reported binge drinking at least once a week. This rate is even higher for those with combat exposure.

Some veterans addicted to prescriptions for pain and PTSD turn to illicit substances. Illicit drugs like heroin are often cheaper and easier to obtain than prescription painkillers.

Some veterans prefer to avoid the VA when looking for any type of medical care because it can take much longer to get treatment. In cases of serious PTSD and/or addiction, getting immediate treatment is essential and seeking treatment outside the VA can be beneficial. There are many qualified treatment centers for addicted veterans with underlying PTSD.

If you’re a veteran struggling with an addiction, California Palms will assist you getting qualified to use VA Community Care or the Veterans Mission Act to cover your costs. We fly Veterans from all over the United States to our luxury rehab in Ohio.

Substance Abuse Treatment Military & Veterans Ohio

Why Veterans Turn to Drugs and Alcohol
Many men and women who are serving or have served in the United States military struggle with addiction.

Veterans who have seen combat may have co-occurring disorders, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, in addition to an addiction.

Traumatic events such as combat exposure and multiple deployments can trigger drug or alcohol use, which all too often lead to addiction.

If a veteran you love is struggling with a drug or alcohol use problem, contact a treatment provider for help finding the right treatment program.

Veterans and PTSD
Many veterans suffering from an addiction have co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Once referred to as “shellshock” and later “battle fatigue,” PTSD can be caused by witnessing warfare or other significantly tragic or startling events.

Although most cases of PTSD are caused by combat, veterans may also develop the disorder after sexual abuse — about 23 percent of female veterans have reported being sexually assaulted during their time in the military.

Some symptoms of PTSD include:

Flashbacks
Memory problems
Low sense of self-worth
Hopelessness
Trouble sleeping
Relationship problems
Aggression
Trouble concentrating
Self-destructive behavior (self-harm or substance abuse)
These symptoms may be triggered by anything that is a reminder of the traumatic incident. Many veterans turn to substance abuse to self-medicate and numb their pain.

More than 20 percent of veterans with PTSD also suffer from an addiction or dependence on drugs or alcohol.

People with PTSD have a harder time overcoming addiction than those without it. The symptoms of withdrawal combined with the symptoms of PTSD amplify negative feelings and emotions that may lead to a relapse.

Addiction treatment programs that focus on PTSD and addiction simultaneously are most successful for veterans.

Addiction to Prescription Medications
Veterans with PTSD are often prescribed anxiety medications, most of which are highly addictive. To curb the risk of addiction, some doctors prescribe non-addictive antidepressant medications such as Paxil or Zoloft. Even veterans without PTSD can become addicted to painkillers prescribed for combat-related injuries.

Common addictive medications prescribed to veterans include:

Painkillers (Lortab, Vicodin, OxyContin)
Benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Xanax)
Sedatives (Ambien, Lunesta)
Veterans taking these drugs may develop a dependence on them, meaning a tolerance to their effects and symptoms of withdrawal when quitting. As time goes on, veterans may spiral into full-blown addiction, which is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior.

In an attempt to mitigate drug abuse among service members and veterans, some advocates are pushing for tighter regulations on how long addictive medications can be prescribed.

Alcohol and Illicit Drugs in the Military
Few service members risk using illicit drugs in the military because it can result in a dishonorable discharge. Drinking, however, is an ingrained part of the military culture that often carries on into civilian life. All too often, veterans and service members self-medicating with alcohol succumb to an addiction.

Approximately 20 percent of service members reported binge drinking at least once a week. This rate is even higher for those with combat exposure.

Some veterans addicted to prescriptions for pain and PTSD turn to illicit substances. Illicit drugs like heroin are often cheaper and easier to obtain than prescription painkillers.

Some veterans prefer to avoid the VA when looking for any type of medical care because it can take much longer to get treatment. In cases of serious PTSD and/or addiction, getting immediate treatment is essential and seeking treatment outside the VA can be beneficial. There are many qualified treatment centers for addicted veterans with underlying PTSD.

If you’re a veteran struggling with an addiction, California Palms will assist you getting qualified to use VA Community Care or the Veterans Mission Act to cover your costs. We fly Veterans from all over the United States to our luxury rehab in Ohio.

Substance Abuse Treatment Military & Veterans

Why Veterans Turn to Drugs and Alcohol
Many men and women who are serving or have served in the United States military struggle with addiction.

Veterans who have seen combat may have co-occurring disorders, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, in addition to an addiction.

Traumatic events such as combat exposure and multiple deployments can trigger drug or alcohol use, which all too often lead to addiction.

If a veteran you love is struggling with a drug or alcohol use problem, contact a treatment provider for help finding the right treatment program.

Veterans and PTSD
Many veterans suffering from an addiction have co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Once referred to as “shellshock” and later “battle fatigue,” PTSD can be caused by witnessing warfare or other significantly tragic or startling events.

Although most cases of PTSD are caused by combat, veterans may also develop the disorder after sexual abuse — about 23 percent of female veterans have reported being sexually assaulted during their time in the military.

Some symptoms of PTSD include:

Flashbacks
Memory problems
Low sense of self-worth
Hopelessness
Trouble sleeping
Relationship problems
Aggression
Trouble concentrating
Self-destructive behavior (self-harm or substance abuse)
These symptoms may be triggered by anything that is a reminder of the traumatic incident. Many veterans turn to substance abuse to self-medicate and numb their pain.

More than 20 percent of veterans with PTSD also suffer from an addiction or dependence on drugs or alcohol.

People with PTSD have a harder time overcoming addiction than those without it. The symptoms of withdrawal combined with the symptoms of PTSD amplify negative feelings and emotions that may lead to a relapse.

Addiction treatment programs that focus on PTSD and addiction simultaneously are most successful for veterans.

Addiction to Prescription Medications
Veterans with PTSD are often prescribed anxiety medications, most of which are highly addictive. To curb the risk of addiction, some doctors prescribe non-addictive antidepressant medications such as Paxil or Zoloft. Even veterans without PTSD can become addicted to painkillers prescribed for combat-related injuries.

Common addictive medications prescribed to veterans include:

Painkillers (Lortab, Vicodin, OxyContin)
Benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Xanax)
Sedatives (Ambien, Lunesta)
Veterans taking these drugs may develop a dependence on them, meaning a tolerance to their effects and symptoms of withdrawal when quitting. As time goes on, veterans may spiral into full-blown addiction, which is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior.

In an attempt to mitigate drug abuse among service members and veterans, some advocates are pushing for tighter regulations on how long addictive medications can be prescribed.

Alcohol and Illicit Drugs in the Military
Few service members risk using illicit drugs in the military because it can result in a dishonorable discharge. Drinking, however, is an ingrained part of the military culture that often carries on into civilian life. All too often, veterans and service members self-medicating with alcohol succumb to an addiction.

Approximately 20 percent of service members reported binge drinking at least once a week. This rate is even higher for those with combat exposure.

Some veterans addicted to prescriptions for pain and PTSD turn to illicit substances. Illicit drugs like heroin are often cheaper and easier to obtain than prescription painkillers.

Some veterans prefer to avoid the VA when looking for any type of medical care because it can take much longer to get treatment. In cases of serious PTSD and/or addiction, getting immediate treatment is essential and seeking treatment outside the VA can be beneficial. There are many qualified treatment centers for addicted veterans with underlying PTSD.

If you’re a veteran struggling with an addiction, California Palms will assist you getting qualified to use VA Community Care or the Veterans Mission Act to cover your costs. We fly Veterans from all over the United States to our luxury rehab in Ohio.

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs Alabama

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs Alabama . Female Veterans Residential Drug & Alcohol Treatment Alabama . California Palms is a Veterans only drug and alcohol addiction treatment center. We offer private luxury drug and alcohol rehabilitation to our female / women military veterans. Our luxury rehab offers private rooms, veterans recovery game room and more. We know that our nations female veterans suffer from the same substance abuse programs as there male counterparts. At California Palms our female veterans get to enjoy the fact that they have a women for your drug, alcohol or PTSD treatment.

TRAVEL COVERED THRU VA COMMUNITY CARE, VA CHOICE PROGRAM AND OTHER SORCES FROM Alabama to our Ohio location

Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment
Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs. Female Veterans Residential Drug & Alcohol Treatment. California Palms is a Veterans only drug and alcohol addiction treatment center. We offer private luxury drug and alcohol rehabilitation to our female / women military veterans. Our luxury rehab offers private rooms, veterans recovery game room and more. We know that our nations female veterans suffer from the same substance abuse programs as there male counterparts. At California Palms our female veterans get to enjoy the fact that they have a women for your drug, alcohol or PTSD treatment.

Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment
Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs. Female Veterans Residential Drug & Alcohol Treatment. California Palms is a Veterans only drug and alcohol addiction treatment center. We offer private luxury drug and alcohol rehabilitation to our female / women military veterans. Our luxury rehab offers private rooms, veterans recovery game room and more. We know that our nations female veterans suffer from the same substance abuse programs as there male counterparts. At California Palms our female veterans get to enjoy the fact that they have a women for your drug, alcohol or PTSD treatment.

Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment
Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment

Addiction & PTSD Treatment for Female Veterans

Addiction & PTSD Treatment for Female Veterans. California Palms Recovery Campus which is designed specifically to support the VA and its mission to provide quality substance abuse and behavioral health treatment to the men and women veterans who sacrificed nearly everything while fighting to defend our relatively pleasant and enjoyable lives. If you are a combat vet, thank you! We can never repay you for what you have done for us. If you are a combat vet and a trauma survivor battling an addiction we want to help you. We are determined to helping restore the life you would have had, had you not gone to war on our behalf.
Find out more at www.caliparc.com or call us at 1-844-29Palms.