Veterans Addiction Help.

A mouse was placed at the top of a jar filled with grains. It was so happy to find so much food around him that no longer he felt the need to run around searching for food. Now he could happily live his life. After a few days of enjoying the grains, he reached the bottom of the jar.
Suddenly, he realize that he was trapped and he couldn’t get out. He now has to fully depend on someone to put grains in the jar for him to survive.
He now has no choice but to eat what he’s given. A slave to his situation.
A few lessons to learn from this:
1) Short term pleasures can lead to long-term traps.
2) If things come easy and you get comfortable, you are getting TRAPPED into dependency.
3) When you are not using your skills, you will lose more than your skills. You lose your CHOICES and FREEDOM.
4) Freedom does not come easy but can be lost quickly. NOTHING comes easily in life and if it comes easily, maybe it is not worth it..
Don’t curse your struggles, embrace them. They are your blessings in disguise.

FREE TRAVEL TO OUR LUXURY REHAB

Substance Abuse Treatment Military & Veterans West Virginia

Why Veterans Turn to Drugs and Alcohol
Many men and women who are serving or have served in the United States military struggle with addiction.

Veterans who have seen combat may have co-occurring disorders, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, in addition to an addiction.

Traumatic events such as combat exposure and multiple deployments can trigger drug or alcohol use, which all too often lead to addiction.

If a veteran you love is struggling with a drug or alcohol use problem, contact a treatment provider for help finding the right treatment program.

Veterans and PTSD
Many veterans suffering from an addiction have co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Once referred to as “shellshock” and later “battle fatigue,” PTSD can be caused by witnessing warfare or other significantly tragic or startling events.

Although most cases of PTSD are caused by combat, veterans may also develop the disorder after sexual abuse — about 23 percent of female veterans have reported being sexually assaulted during their time in the military.

Some symptoms of PTSD include:

Flashbacks
Memory problems
Low sense of self-worth
Hopelessness
Trouble sleeping
Relationship problems
Aggression
Trouble concentrating
Self-destructive behavior (self-harm or substance abuse)
These symptoms may be triggered by anything that is a reminder of the traumatic incident. Many veterans turn to substance abuse to self-medicate and numb their pain.

More than 20 percent of veterans with PTSD also suffer from an addiction or dependence on drugs or alcohol.

People with PTSD have a harder time overcoming addiction than those without it. The symptoms of withdrawal combined with the symptoms of PTSD amplify negative feelings and emotions that may lead to a relapse.

Addiction treatment programs that focus on PTSD and addiction simultaneously are most successful for veterans.

Addiction to Prescription Medications
Veterans with PTSD are often prescribed anxiety medications, most of which are highly addictive. To curb the risk of addiction, some doctors prescribe non-addictive antidepressant medications such as Paxil or Zoloft. Even veterans without PTSD can become addicted to painkillers prescribed for combat-related injuries.

Common addictive medications prescribed to veterans include:

Painkillers (Lortab, Vicodin, OxyContin)
Benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Xanax)
Sedatives (Ambien, Lunesta)
Veterans taking these drugs may develop a dependence on them, meaning a tolerance to their effects and symptoms of withdrawal when quitting. As time goes on, veterans may spiral into full-blown addiction, which is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior.

In an attempt to mitigate drug abuse among service members and veterans, some advocates are pushing for tighter regulations on how long addictive medications can be prescribed.

Alcohol and Illicit Drugs in the Military
Few service members risk using illicit drugs in the military because it can result in a dishonorable discharge. Drinking, however, is an ingrained part of the military culture that often carries on into civilian life. All too often, veterans and service members self-medicating with alcohol succumb to an addiction.

Approximately 20 percent of service members reported binge drinking at least once a week. This rate is even higher for those with combat exposure.

Some veterans addicted to prescriptions for pain and PTSD turn to illicit substances. Illicit drugs like heroin are often cheaper and easier to obtain than prescription painkillers.

Some veterans prefer to avoid the VA when looking for any type of medical care because it can take much longer to get treatment. In cases of serious PTSD and/or addiction, getting immediate treatment is essential and seeking treatment outside the VA can be beneficial. There are many qualified treatment centers for addicted veterans with underlying PTSD.

If you’re a veteran struggling with an addiction, California Palms will assist you getting qualified to use VA Community Care or the Veterans Mission Act to cover your costs. We fly Veterans from all over the United States to our luxury rehab in Ohio.

Substance Abuse Treatment Military & Veterans Michigan

Why Veterans Turn to Drugs and Alcohol
Many men and women who are serving or have served in the United States military struggle with addiction.

Veterans who have seen combat may have co-occurring disorders, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, in addition to an addiction.

Traumatic events such as combat exposure and multiple deployments can trigger drug or alcohol use, which all too often lead to addiction.

If a veteran you love is struggling with a drug or alcohol use problem, contact a treatment provider for help finding the right treatment program.

Veterans and PTSD
Many veterans suffering from an addiction have co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Once referred to as “shellshock” and later “battle fatigue,” PTSD can be caused by witnessing warfare or other significantly tragic or startling events.

Although most cases of PTSD are caused by combat, veterans may also develop the disorder after sexual abuse — about 23 percent of female veterans have reported being sexually assaulted during their time in the military.

Some symptoms of PTSD include:

Flashbacks
Memory problems
Low sense of self-worth
Hopelessness
Trouble sleeping
Relationship problems
Aggression
Trouble concentrating
Self-destructive behavior (self-harm or substance abuse)
These symptoms may be triggered by anything that is a reminder of the traumatic incident. Many veterans turn to substance abuse to self-medicate and numb their pain.

More than 20 percent of veterans with PTSD also suffer from an addiction or dependence on drugs or alcohol.

People with PTSD have a harder time overcoming addiction than those without it. The symptoms of withdrawal combined with the symptoms of PTSD amplify negative feelings and emotions that may lead to a relapse.

Addiction treatment programs that focus on PTSD and addiction simultaneously are most successful for veterans.

Addiction to Prescription Medications
Veterans with PTSD are often prescribed anxiety medications, most of which are highly addictive. To curb the risk of addiction, some doctors prescribe non-addictive antidepressant medications such as Paxil or Zoloft. Even veterans without PTSD can become addicted to painkillers prescribed for combat-related injuries.

Common addictive medications prescribed to veterans include:

Painkillers (Lortab, Vicodin, OxyContin)
Benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Xanax)
Sedatives (Ambien, Lunesta)
Veterans taking these drugs may develop a dependence on them, meaning a tolerance to their effects and symptoms of withdrawal when quitting. As time goes on, veterans may spiral into full-blown addiction, which is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior.

In an attempt to mitigate drug abuse among service members and veterans, some advocates are pushing for tighter regulations on how long addictive medications can be prescribed.

Alcohol and Illicit Drugs in the Military
Few service members risk using illicit drugs in the military because it can result in a dishonorable discharge. Drinking, however, is an ingrained part of the military culture that often carries on into civilian life. All too often, veterans and service members self-medicating with alcohol succumb to an addiction.

Approximately 20 percent of service members reported binge drinking at least once a week. This rate is even higher for those with combat exposure.

Some veterans addicted to prescriptions for pain and PTSD turn to illicit substances. Illicit drugs like heroin are often cheaper and easier to obtain than prescription painkillers.

Some veterans prefer to avoid the VA when looking for any type of medical care because it can take much longer to get treatment. In cases of serious PTSD and/or addiction, getting immediate treatment is essential and seeking treatment outside the VA can be beneficial. There are many qualified treatment centers for addicted veterans with underlying PTSD.

If you’re a veteran struggling with an addiction, California Palms will assist you getting qualified to use VA Community Care or the Veterans Mission Act to cover your costs. We fly Veterans from all over the United States to our luxury rehab in Ohio.

Substance Abuse Treatment Military & Veterans Ohio

Why Veterans Turn to Drugs and Alcohol
Many men and women who are serving or have served in the United States military struggle with addiction.

Veterans who have seen combat may have co-occurring disorders, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, in addition to an addiction.

Traumatic events such as combat exposure and multiple deployments can trigger drug or alcohol use, which all too often lead to addiction.

If a veteran you love is struggling with a drug or alcohol use problem, contact a treatment provider for help finding the right treatment program.

Veterans and PTSD
Many veterans suffering from an addiction have co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Once referred to as “shellshock” and later “battle fatigue,” PTSD can be caused by witnessing warfare or other significantly tragic or startling events.

Although most cases of PTSD are caused by combat, veterans may also develop the disorder after sexual abuse — about 23 percent of female veterans have reported being sexually assaulted during their time in the military.

Some symptoms of PTSD include:

Flashbacks
Memory problems
Low sense of self-worth
Hopelessness
Trouble sleeping
Relationship problems
Aggression
Trouble concentrating
Self-destructive behavior (self-harm or substance abuse)
These symptoms may be triggered by anything that is a reminder of the traumatic incident. Many veterans turn to substance abuse to self-medicate and numb their pain.

More than 20 percent of veterans with PTSD also suffer from an addiction or dependence on drugs or alcohol.

People with PTSD have a harder time overcoming addiction than those without it. The symptoms of withdrawal combined with the symptoms of PTSD amplify negative feelings and emotions that may lead to a relapse.

Addiction treatment programs that focus on PTSD and addiction simultaneously are most successful for veterans.

Addiction to Prescription Medications
Veterans with PTSD are often prescribed anxiety medications, most of which are highly addictive. To curb the risk of addiction, some doctors prescribe non-addictive antidepressant medications such as Paxil or Zoloft. Even veterans without PTSD can become addicted to painkillers prescribed for combat-related injuries.

Common addictive medications prescribed to veterans include:

Painkillers (Lortab, Vicodin, OxyContin)
Benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Xanax)
Sedatives (Ambien, Lunesta)
Veterans taking these drugs may develop a dependence on them, meaning a tolerance to their effects and symptoms of withdrawal when quitting. As time goes on, veterans may spiral into full-blown addiction, which is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior.

In an attempt to mitigate drug abuse among service members and veterans, some advocates are pushing for tighter regulations on how long addictive medications can be prescribed.

Alcohol and Illicit Drugs in the Military
Few service members risk using illicit drugs in the military because it can result in a dishonorable discharge. Drinking, however, is an ingrained part of the military culture that often carries on into civilian life. All too often, veterans and service members self-medicating with alcohol succumb to an addiction.

Approximately 20 percent of service members reported binge drinking at least once a week. This rate is even higher for those with combat exposure.

Some veterans addicted to prescriptions for pain and PTSD turn to illicit substances. Illicit drugs like heroin are often cheaper and easier to obtain than prescription painkillers.

Some veterans prefer to avoid the VA when looking for any type of medical care because it can take much longer to get treatment. In cases of serious PTSD and/or addiction, getting immediate treatment is essential and seeking treatment outside the VA can be beneficial. There are many qualified treatment centers for addicted veterans with underlying PTSD.

If you’re a veteran struggling with an addiction, California Palms will assist you getting qualified to use VA Community Care or the Veterans Mission Act to cover your costs. We fly Veterans from all over the United States to our luxury rehab in Ohio.

Substance Abuse Treatment Military & Veterans

Why Veterans Turn to Drugs and Alcohol
Many men and women who are serving or have served in the United States military struggle with addiction.

Veterans who have seen combat may have co-occurring disorders, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, in addition to an addiction.

Traumatic events such as combat exposure and multiple deployments can trigger drug or alcohol use, which all too often lead to addiction.

If a veteran you love is struggling with a drug or alcohol use problem, contact a treatment provider for help finding the right treatment program.

Veterans and PTSD
Many veterans suffering from an addiction have co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Once referred to as “shellshock” and later “battle fatigue,” PTSD can be caused by witnessing warfare or other significantly tragic or startling events.

Although most cases of PTSD are caused by combat, veterans may also develop the disorder after sexual abuse — about 23 percent of female veterans have reported being sexually assaulted during their time in the military.

Some symptoms of PTSD include:

Flashbacks
Memory problems
Low sense of self-worth
Hopelessness
Trouble sleeping
Relationship problems
Aggression
Trouble concentrating
Self-destructive behavior (self-harm or substance abuse)
These symptoms may be triggered by anything that is a reminder of the traumatic incident. Many veterans turn to substance abuse to self-medicate and numb their pain.

More than 20 percent of veterans with PTSD also suffer from an addiction or dependence on drugs or alcohol.

People with PTSD have a harder time overcoming addiction than those without it. The symptoms of withdrawal combined with the symptoms of PTSD amplify negative feelings and emotions that may lead to a relapse.

Addiction treatment programs that focus on PTSD and addiction simultaneously are most successful for veterans.

Addiction to Prescription Medications
Veterans with PTSD are often prescribed anxiety medications, most of which are highly addictive. To curb the risk of addiction, some doctors prescribe non-addictive antidepressant medications such as Paxil or Zoloft. Even veterans without PTSD can become addicted to painkillers prescribed for combat-related injuries.

Common addictive medications prescribed to veterans include:

Painkillers (Lortab, Vicodin, OxyContin)
Benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Xanax)
Sedatives (Ambien, Lunesta)
Veterans taking these drugs may develop a dependence on them, meaning a tolerance to their effects and symptoms of withdrawal when quitting. As time goes on, veterans may spiral into full-blown addiction, which is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior.

In an attempt to mitigate drug abuse among service members and veterans, some advocates are pushing for tighter regulations on how long addictive medications can be prescribed.

Alcohol and Illicit Drugs in the Military
Few service members risk using illicit drugs in the military because it can result in a dishonorable discharge. Drinking, however, is an ingrained part of the military culture that often carries on into civilian life. All too often, veterans and service members self-medicating with alcohol succumb to an addiction.

Approximately 20 percent of service members reported binge drinking at least once a week. This rate is even higher for those with combat exposure.

Some veterans addicted to prescriptions for pain and PTSD turn to illicit substances. Illicit drugs like heroin are often cheaper and easier to obtain than prescription painkillers.

Some veterans prefer to avoid the VA when looking for any type of medical care because it can take much longer to get treatment. In cases of serious PTSD and/or addiction, getting immediate treatment is essential and seeking treatment outside the VA can be beneficial. There are many qualified treatment centers for addicted veterans with underlying PTSD.

If you’re a veteran struggling with an addiction, California Palms will assist you getting qualified to use VA Community Care or the Veterans Mission Act to cover your costs. We fly Veterans from all over the United States to our luxury rehab in Ohio.

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs Alabama

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs Alabama . Female Veterans Residential Drug & Alcohol Treatment Alabama . California Palms is a Veterans only drug and alcohol addiction treatment center. We offer private luxury drug and alcohol rehabilitation to our female / women military veterans. Our luxury rehab offers private rooms, veterans recovery game room and more. We know that our nations female veterans suffer from the same substance abuse programs as there male counterparts. At California Palms our female veterans get to enjoy the fact that they have a women for your drug, alcohol or PTSD treatment.

TRAVEL COVERED THRU VA COMMUNITY CARE, VA CHOICE PROGRAM AND OTHER SORCES FROM Alabama to our Ohio location

Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment
Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs. Female Veterans Residential Drug & Alcohol Treatment. California Palms is a Veterans only drug and alcohol addiction treatment center. We offer private luxury drug and alcohol rehabilitation to our female / women military veterans. Our luxury rehab offers private rooms, veterans recovery game room and more. We know that our nations female veterans suffer from the same substance abuse programs as there male counterparts. At California Palms our female veterans get to enjoy the fact that they have a women for your drug, alcohol or PTSD treatment.

Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment
Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs

Female Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs. Female Veterans Residential Drug & Alcohol Treatment. California Palms is a Veterans only drug and alcohol addiction treatment center. We offer private luxury drug and alcohol rehabilitation to our female / women military veterans. Our luxury rehab offers private rooms, veterans recovery game room and more. We know that our nations female veterans suffer from the same substance abuse programs as there male counterparts. At California Palms our female veterans get to enjoy the fact that they have a women for your drug, alcohol or PTSD treatment.

Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment
Female Veterans Substance Abuse Treatment

Addiction & PTSD Treatment for Female Veterans

Addiction & PTSD Treatment for Female Veterans. California Palms Recovery Campus which is designed specifically to support the VA and its mission to provide quality substance abuse and behavioral health treatment to the men and women veterans who sacrificed nearly everything while fighting to defend our relatively pleasant and enjoyable lives. If you are a combat vet, thank you! We can never repay you for what you have done for us. If you are a combat vet and a trauma survivor battling an addiction we want to help you. We are determined to helping restore the life you would have had, had you not gone to war on our behalf.
Find out more at www.caliparc.com or call us at 1-844-29Palms.

California Palms Veterans Addiction Recovery

California Palms Recovery Campus which is designed specifically to support the VA and its mission to provide quality substance abuse and behavioral mental health treatment to the men and women who sacrificed nearly everything while fighting to defend our relatively pleasant and enjoyable lives. If you are a combat vet, thank you! We can never repay you for what you have done for us. If you are a combat vet and a trauma survivor battling an addiction we want to help you. We are determined to helping restore the life you would have had, had you not gone to war on our behalf. Find out more at www.caliparc.com or call us at 1-844-29Palms.

The Veterans Administration has a total of 900 Behavioral Health beds – 900
3 million Americans go to war
500,000 have emotional disorders
300,000 have PTSD
the VA has 900 beds
900

Is it any wonder that combat vets are 10 times more likely to be addicted to opiates and 15 times more likely to commit suicide?

This low capacity is not the VA’s fault. The responsibility lies with “We the People” – our government is short-changing the very citizens they sent to war and this injustice must stop – now!