PTSD Treatment for Veterans Lifelong Emotional Casualties of War

PTSD Treatment for Veterans Lifelong Emotional Casualties of War .

PTSD TREATMENT FOR VETERANS
PTSD TREATMENT FOR VETERANS

Lifelong Emotional Casualties of War – There is no Purple Heart for Combat Vets
We Have Cheated Our Combat Vets From Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness
Gunshot wounds, missing limbs, broken bones, bad knees, and arthritic hips, are just some of the many issues our military men and women have to fight in addition to our enemies on the battlefield. Too often, these and many other major and minor physical issues have been treated with opioid-based prescription painkillers.

Nightmares, flashbacks, anxiety, depression, and traumatic stress are unfortunately lesser-known mental and emotional ailments that our best and brightest also bring home. These overwhelmingly painful conditions often last far longer and have significantly more impact than any physical injury. In fact, every facet of the total-being is negatively affected by the never-ending battles waged in the combat survivor’s mind.

There is no Purple Heart for PTSD, despite the fact that it may be the most serious combat injury our veterans could experience.

The combination of physical injury treated with opioid pain medications often proves lethal for many of our veterans. These substances relieve not only the physical pains of battle but also deaden the emotional pain of combat-related emotional stress.

In a very short period of time, a combat veteran could survive serious physical injuries on the battlefield, and return safely home, only to find that the true battle for his or her life, soul, and meaning is only beginning. Traumatic stress and inevitable addictions, which usually arise due to self-medicating the physical and unbearable emotional pain, are often battles that Airmen, Airwomen, Sailors, Marines, and Soldiers must continue to fight long after they come home from foreign lands.

The battlefield of the mind, where traumatic stress and addiction are the enemies, is too often the theater of war where our combat survivors become fatal casualties. In fact, a military combat vet is 10 times more likely, than a non-vet, to overdose and die from opiate addiction.

We as a nation have failed these brave men and women. Instead of welcoming them home with a promise of no more wars to fight, we immediately engage them in a personal fight for survival against traumatic stress and/or opioid addiction. Even worse – we again put them in harm’s way with little support and few weapons.

Nearly 3 million American servicemen and servicewomen have fought in the global war on terror; of that number as many as 500,000 have some behavioral health issues and at least 300,000 have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Veterans Administration has a total of 900 Behavioral Health beds – 900

3 million Americans go to war
500,000 have emotional disorders
300,000 have PTSD
the VA has 900 beds
900

Is it any wonder that combat vets are 10 times more likely to be addicted to opiates and 15 times more likely to commit suicide?

This low capacity is not the VA’s fault. The responsibility lies with “We the People” – our government is short-changing the very citizens they sent to war and this injustice must stop – now! #caliparc #heroinlivinganddying #sandalwood #PTSD #Overdose #recovery

VA Wait-time for Substance Abuse Treatment

A new VA wait-time scandal is brewing and we have no way to know how big it is
COVID-19 sent shock waves through the VA system, and now veterans aren’t getting the appointments they need.
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the cancellation, delay or rescheduling of almost 20 million medical appointments for veterans.

Part of that is a result of many Veterans Affairs medical facilities being fully or partially shut down because of the pandemic. But that’s only half the story.

For those who can’t get care at a VA facility, community care under the VA MISSION Act should be an alternative. It isn’t working out that way.

The entire Massachusetts congressional delegation wrote to VA Secretary Denis McDonough last month to protest “reports of veterans being asked to travel to Connecticut, New Hampshire and Rhode Island for appointments, including a veteran with Multiple Sclerosis who had to drive 210 miles round trip in a blizzard to an appointment in Connecticut.”

The cancellation and delay of appointments is unacceptable
The VA Office of Inspector General determined that of the 7.3 million appointments canceled from March 15 through May 1, nearly a third (2.3 million) had no indication of follow-up or tracking at the time of the review.

This is unacceptable. As we learned from the 2014 Phoenix VA Medical Center wait-time scandal, delayed health care and long wait times can kill veterans as surely as an improvised explosive device.

How bad is it this time around?

Shocking as it might seem, we have no way of knowing what the real wait times are at VA facilities because the VA has not reported relevant data for almost two years, since implementation of the Community Care Program created by the VA MISSION Act began on June 6, 2019.

That’s because the VA is still using metrics established under the old Veterans Choice Program rather than those created for Community Care, which requires an appointment within 20 days of the date of request for primary care, mental health care and noninstitutional extended care services, or 28 days of the date of request for specialty care.

But while we might not have reliable data on wait times at VA facilities, we do know how poorly a job VA is doing scheduling community care.

“According to VA internal data from October 2019 through June 2020, veterans waited an average of 41.9 days for an appointment in the community, starting from the time he or she requested the appointment to the time the meeting occurred,” Federal News Network reported last fall.
It all adds up to another wait-time scandal waiting to happen. After inheriting this problem from the previous administration, that’s surely not how Secretary McDonough wants to begin his tenure.

Secretary McDonough needs to fix the problem now
He needs to get a handle on the situation now. The first step is for the VA to finally report meaningful wait times based on the metrics provided by the MISSION Act Community Care regulation. Only then will we know how bad the situation is.

VA then needs to develop and implement a plan to follow up and track every veteran who gets an appointment at a VA facility or in the community in accordance with the access standards, in line with Secretary McDonough’s assurances.

“I promise to fight — every single day — to ensure that our veterans have the access to world-class, compassionate care they have earned,” Secretary McDonough said at his confirmation hearing.

Since COVID-19 hit a year ago, veterans have not been getting timely access to the world-class care we deserve. We urge the new secretary to heed the words of his distinguished predecessor, Gen. Omar Bradley, “We are dealing with (veterans), not procedures; with their problems, not ours.”

Darin Selnick is a senior adviser for Concerned Veterans for America and an Air Force veteran. He served as veterans’ affairs adviser on President Donald Trump’s Domestic Policy Council and as a senior adviser to the VA secretary.

VA Substance abuse Program Locator

VA Substance abuse Program Locator Are you a veterans who suffers from Drug abuse or Alcohol addiction. We offer veterans who need substance abuse treatment at our location for veterans from anywhere in the United States.
The VA substance abuse treatment program can be paid for using Community Care Program, VA Choice Program or the Veterans Masson Act. If you need residual substance abuse treatment call us we can arrange your travel for free to our luxury veterans only treatment program
The California Palms is the largest private rehab center in the country providing treatment exclusively to veterans and active duty military from substance abuse, drug abuse, alcohol abuse, opioid abuse, heroin abuse, and/or co-occurring psychological disorders like PTSD, depression, etc.

VA Substance abuse Program Locator

VA Substance abuse Program Locator Are you a veterans who suffers from Drug abuse or Alcohol addiction. We offer veterans who need substance abuse treatment at our location for veterans from anywhere in the United States.
The VA substance abuse treatment program can be paid for using Community Care Program, VA Choice Program or the Veterans Masson Act. If you need residual substance abuse treatment call us we can arrange your travel for free to our luxury veterans only treatment program
The California Palms is the largest private rehab center in the country providing treatment exclusively to veterans and active duty military from substance abuse, drug abuse, alcohol abuse, opioid abuse, heroin abuse, and/or co-occurring psychological disorders like PTSD, depression, etc.

Drug Treatment Veterans Community Care Program Ohio

Drug Treatment Veterans Community Care Program Ohio. Caliparc offers residential drug and alcohol substance abuse treatment using the VA Community Care Program and Veterans Choice Program.
Veterans can also seek community-based services through the MISSION Act Community Care program. These benefits can be used for mental health treatment, substance abuse treatment, or treatment for co-occurring disorders.
The California Palms is an approved provider for Veterans Community Care and accepts the reimbursement for treatment under the VA Community Care. All care must be preauthorized. The Veteran must meet certain eligibility requirements, a veteran must be enrolled in VA health care and must be told by your local VA medical facility that you will need to wait more than 30 days for an appointment, or the veterans residence is more than a 40 mile driving distance from the closest VA medical facility with a full-time primary care physician.

Veterans Opioid Addiction Treatment Caliparc Veterans Center

Veteran substance abuse is a growing problem in the USA. As military members return from deployment suffering from physical and mental health problems and disabilities due to their experiences while deployed, substance abuse becomes more prevalent. Combat today is vastly different than it was even 40-50 years ago, and the new war on terror has increased the trauma and emotional toll combat has had on our service members.

Prescription drug abuse is on the rise among veterans because many are treated with powerful narcotic pain medications for injuries. Over time, veterans can become dependent on these drugs and eventually an addiction can develop. Alcohol abuse and addiction is also more common among the military population while some other substances are used far less frequently and are far less of an issue. Why is Veteran Substance Abuse so Common?

There are several different reasons why veteran substance abuse is so common. These service members have gone through some very tough and traumatic experiences while they were deployed, and this has left psychological or physical scars, sometimes both. Substance abuse may be an attempt to self-medicate or to deal with problematic symptoms of mental or physical disorders or injuries.

Any veteran who has issues with alcohol or drug abuse should seek proper substance abuse treatment as soon as possible. Veterans who have a substance abuse issue can contact the US Department of Veterans Affairs for treatment program options. This help can be sought in the private sector also. Substance abuse is a problem that will not just go away.

A larger study that involved more than 675,000 active duty personnel determined that the rate of both substance use disorders and depression has increased among active members of the military.

The Veterans Alcohol and Drug Dependence Rehabilitation Program is a veteran substance abuse treatment and rehab program operated by the Department of Veterans Affairs. The program offers a variety of therapies and support services to eligible veterans who have a substance abuse disorder. Treatment services are provided at numerous VA medical centers and clinics around the country.

In order to qualify for veteran substance abuse treatment through the VA the veteran must be enrolled in the VA health care system. In addition, the veteran must have a discharge that is not dishonorable. Honorable, General, and Under Honorable discharges are usually eligible.
Why are Some Service Members Hesitant to Use the VA for Substance Abuse Treatment?

For some who need veteran substance abuse treatment the VA may not be the preferred treatment provider for a variety of reasons. The wait times at some VA locations can be extensive. There is still a stigma associated with substance abuse, and some veterans may feel that they could receive better treatment and care in the private medical sector instead.

Rural Areas May Pose Unique Challenges to Effective Substance Abuse Treatment
Another potential obstacle to proper veteran substance abuse treatment is location, and vets in rural areas may have far fewer treatment options open to them. In some cases when there is not an appropriate VA facility within a reasonable distance a veteran may be able to seek private sector care that is covered by the government.

Veterans Community Care for Substance Abuse Drug and Alcohol Treatment Programs

Veterans Community Care for Substance Abuse Drug and Alcohol Treatment Programs

In this situation, VA is unable to schedule an appointment that is within both average driving time standards and wait time standards. For average drive time to a specific VA medical facility, the access standards are:

30-minute average drive time for primary care, mental health, and non-institutional extended care services (including adult day health care)
60-minute average drive time for specialty care
For appointment wait times at a specific VA medical facility, the access standards are:

20 days for primary care, mental health care, and non-institutional extended care services, unless the Veteran agrees to a later date in consultation with their VA health care provider
28 days for specialty care from the date of request, unless the Veteran agrees to a later date in consultation with their VA health care provider

Delaware Veteran Drug & Alcohol Rehab Veterans Recovery Resources

Delaware Veteran Drug & Alcohol Rehab Veterans Recovery Resources
Delaware PTSD and Substance Abuse in Veterans. Some veterans try to cope with PTSD symptoms by drinking heavily, using drugs, or smoking too much. Military veterans who have problems with drugs or alcohol are also more likely to develop PTSD. The good news is that treatment works, and therapy can target both problems at the same time.
What is the relationship between PTSD and addiction?
The relationship between PTSD and addiction is clear. According to the VA, more than one in five veterans with PTSD have a substance use disorder and one out of three veterans who seek addiction treatment has PTSD.
How Common Is Co-occurring PTSD and SUD in Veterans?
More than 2 of 10 Veterans with PTSD also have SUD.
Almost 1 out of every 3 Veterans seeking treatment for SUD also has PTSD.
The number of Veterans who smoke (nicotine) is almost double for those with PTSD (about 6 of 10) versus those without a PTSD diagnosis (3 of 10).
In the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, about 1 in 10 returning Veterans seen in VA have a problem with alcohol or other drugs.
War Veterans with PTSD and alcohol problems tend to binge drink. Binge drinking is when a person drinks a lot of alcohol (4-5 drinks or more) in a short period of time (1-2 hours).

TRAVEL COVERED UNDER MOST VA AND INSURACE PLANS

Connecticut Veteran Drug & Alcohol Rehab Veterans Recovery Resources

Connecticut Veteran Drug & Alcohol Rehab Veterans Recovery Resources
Connecticut PTSD and Substance Abuse in Veterans. Some people try to cope with PTSD symptoms by drinking heavily, using drugs, or smoking too much. People who have problems with drugs or alcohol are also more likely to develop PTSD. The good news is that treatment works, and therapy can target both problems at the same time.
What is the relationship between PTSD and addiction?
The relationship between PTSD and addiction is clear. According to the VA, more than one in five veterans with PTSD have a substance use disorder and one out of three veterans who seek addiction treatment has PTSD.
How Common Is Co-occurring PTSD and SUD in Veterans?
More than 2 of 10 Veterans with PTSD also have SUD.
Almost 1 out of every 3 Veterans seeking treatment for SUD also has PTSD.
The number of Veterans who smoke (nicotine) is almost double for those with PTSD (about 6 of 10) versus those without a PTSD diagnosis (3 of 10).
In the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, about 1 in 10 returning Veterans seen in VA have a problem with alcohol or other drugs.
War Veterans with PTSD and alcohol problems tend to binge drink. Binge drinking is when a person drinks a lot of alcohol (4-5 drinks or more) in a short period of time (1-2 hours).

TRAVEL COVERED UNDER MOST VA AND INSURACE PLANS

Arkansas Veteran Drug & Alcohol Rehab Veterans Recovery Resources

Arkansas Veteran Drug & Alcohol Rehab Veterans Recovery Resources
PTSD and Substance Abuse in Veterans. Some people try to cope with PTSD symptoms by drinking heavily, using drugs, or smoking too much. People who have problems with drugs or alcohol are also more likely to develop PTSD. The good news is that treatment works, and therapy can target both problems at the same time.
What is the relationship between PTSD and addiction?
The relationship between PTSD and addiction is clear. According to the VA, more than one in five veterans with PTSD have a substance use disorder and one out of three veterans who seek addiction treatment has PTSD.
How Common Is Co-occurring PTSD and SUD in Veterans?
More than 2 of 10 Veterans with PTSD also have SUD.
Almost 1 out of every 3 Veterans seeking treatment for SUD also has PTSD.
The number of Veterans who smoke (nicotine) is almost double for those with PTSD (about 6 of 10) versus those without a PTSD diagnosis (3 of 10).
In the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, about 1 in 10 returning Veterans seen in VA have a problem with alcohol or other drugs.
War Veterans with PTSD and alcohol problems tend to binge drink. Binge drinking is when a person drinks a lot of alcohol (4-5 drinks or more) in a short period of time (1-2 hours).

TRAVEL COVERED UNDER MOST VA AND INSURACE PLANS