Stress & Triggers Therapy

CALIFORNIA PALMS GROUP THERAPY SESSION

STRESS AND TRIGGERS THERAPY (200–299)

STRESS & TRIGGERS THERAPY (200-299)
Group 200 – Stress Therapy
Group 203 – Recognizing Stress
Group 205 – Manage Feelings in Stressful Situations
Group 207 – Reducing Stress
Group 209 – Assertive Communication Not Aggressive
Group 210 – Stress Management Toolkit
Group 215 – Coping with Anxiety – Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Group 220 – Coping with Anxiety – Exposure Therapy
Group 225 – Identifying Internal Triggers
Group 230 – Identifying External Triggers
Group 235 – Emotional Triggers
Group 240 – Coping with Triggers
Group 245 – Enabling
Group 250 – Anger Management in Recovery
Group 255 – Self-Forgiveness
Group 260 – Guilt and Shame
Group 265 – Self Esteem
Group 270 – Thinking, Feeling and Doing
Group 275 – Sleep Therapy
Group 280 – Truthfulness
Group 285 – Illness
Group 290 – Boredom
Group 295 – Staying Busy

CALIFORNIA PALMS GROUP THERAPY SESSION

Group 200 – Stress Therapy: The Stress Therapy group therapy session teaches Cognitive Behavioral Therapy a treatment approach that encompasses assessment strategies, cognitive and behavioral treatment techniques, and relies on collaboration between therapist and clients, who are responsible to complete homework assignments. Clients during group sessions learn cognitive restructuring is the process of learning to change cognitive distortions, aiming to replace one’s irrational, counter-factual beliefs with more accurate and beneficial ones. This is established by helping the client gain awareness of detrimental thought habits, learn to challenge them and substitute life-enhancing thoughts and beliefs.

Group 203 – Recognizing Stress: The Recognizing Stress group therapy session teaches clients to recognize signs of stress in their lives. The group session teaches clients to understand the threat stress poses to recovery. The group session helps clients identify strategies to cope with stress. The session is done in a group setting where clients share similar experiences. Group members motivate and encourage each other to communicate about their experiences and learn to process their reaction to these experiences.

Group 205 – Manage Feelings in Stressful Situations: The Manage Feelings in Stressful Situations group therapy session teaches ten strategies for managing emotions and tapping into your body and brain’s capacity for shifting negative emotions into a more positive or calm mood. (1) Smile to make yourself feel good. (2) Smile to make others feel good. (3) Get up and move. (4) Check in with your body. (5) Physically remove the tension. (6) Breathe. (7) Talk to someone. (8) Disengage and re-engage emotions. (9) Label your emotion. (10) Label emotions for others. The clients is taught to check in with their feelings, consider the emotions that will be most effective for themselves and others, and choose one or more of these actions to take charge of their emotions. The session is done in a group setting where clients share similar experiences. Group members motivate and encourage each other to communicate about their experiences and learn to process their reaction to these experiences.

Group 207 – Reducing Stress: The Reducing Stress group therapy session teaches clients to understand that stress can affect recovery adversely. The group session teaches clients to identify the aspects of their daily lives that are stressful and teaches clients to identify strategies to reduce stress. The session is done in a group setting where clients share similar experiences. Group members motivate and encourage each other to communicate about their experiences and learn to process their reaction to these experiences. Profound friendships are formed during group therapy because many members relate to each other during recovery.

Group 209 – Assertive Communication Not Aggressive: The Assertive Communication Not Aggressive Group Therapy teaches addicts that they need to learn new living skills to replace the roles substances played in their lives. Important skills to be acquired in early recovery are communication and relationship skills. Assertiveness is necessary for communication and relationship skills. This self-assured style not only involves being able to stand up for one’s own rights without trampling on the rights of others, it involves being able to say no without feeling guilty. The session is done in a group setting where clients share similar experiences. Group members encourage each other to communicate about their experiences and learn to process their reaction to these experiences.

Group 210 – Stress Management Toolkit: The Stress Management Toolkit group therapy session teaches clients of the stress emergency kit to combat stress for oneself and others. The session is done in a group setting where clients share similar experiences. Group members motivate and encourage each other to communicate about their experiences and learn to process their reaction to these experiences.

Group 215 – Coping with Anxiety – Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: The Coping with Anxiety – Cognitive Behavioral Therapy group therapy session identifies and addresses how an individual’s thoughts and behaviors interact to create anxiety. Therapists work with clients to recognize how negative thought patterns influence a person’s feelings and behaviors. Therapist attempts to intervene by changing negative thought patterns, teaching relaxation skills, and changing behaviors that lead to problem worsening. The therapist educates clients about anxiety. The therapist teaches the client that each time they avoid an anxiety-producing situation, their anxiety will be even worse the next time around. Clients will be educated about symptoms and common reactions to anxiety. Once the client can recognize when they feel anxious, they can intervene during those situations. The clients practice identifying their thoughts by practicing in session, and then completing a thought log for homework. Once the client has practiced identifying their negative thoughts and have somewhat proficient recognizing them, the therapist will challenge these thoughts.

Group 220 – Coping with Anxiety – Exposure Therapy: The Coping with Anxiety – Exposure Therapy group therapy session teaches clients that the basic idea of exposure therapy is to face your fears. When someone exposes themselves to the source of their anxieties and nothing bad happens, the anxiety lessens. Gradually, the therapist works their way up to the feared stimuli with the client in a process called systematic desensitization. Before following through and exposing client to the stimuli, they must learn relaxation skills to learn during the process, such as deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation and meditation. The client will follow through with the fear hierarchy (with therapist assistance). The goal is for the client to be exposed to stimuli that are only moderate anxiety-producing while using relaxation skills to manage their response. Eventually, client will move on to more challenging situations that they identified in the fear hierarchy. The exposure process should happen over the course of several sessions, the client should be allowed to become comfortable at each stage before moving on. The therapist presents the feared stimuli and ask the client to use relaxation skill; stimuli is eventually taken away and process is discussed.

Group 225 – Identifying Internal Triggers: The Identifying Internal Triggers group therapy session teaches clients to identify internal and external triggers. Internal Triggers are stressful situations that trigger relapse. Stress is a part of life, but it doesn’t have to drive a negative response if an individual learns to manage it. There are several healthy outlets to relieve stress such as exercise, yoga and meditation. Feelings of fear, anxiety, guilt depression and loneliness can make one reach for the comfort that substance used to bring. When these inevitable feelings arise, the client is taught to deal with them in a healthy way. Whether it’s taking a walk, calling a sponsor, a trusted friend or family member recognize when to use these outlets. Part of a client’s recovery, counselors will help them structure their day to encourage abstinence. Order and structure can help to lessen the risk of relapse. Structuring the client’s day with sleep, nutrition, exercise and fulfilling activities helps them keep focused and on track for long-term recovery.

Group 230 – Identifying External Triggers: The Identifying External Triggers group therapy session teaches clients to identify internal and external triggers. External Triggers are what people, places, things or situations remind would make an individual want to use again. Feelings of fear, anxiety, guilt depression and loneliness can make one reach for the comfort that substance used to bring. When these inevitable feelings arise, the client is taught to deal with them in a healthy way. Whether it’s taking a walk, calling a sponsor, a trusted friend or family member recognize when to use these outlets. Part of a client’s recovery, counselors will teach them to structure their day to encourage abstinence. Order and structure can also help lessen the risk of relapse. Structuring the client’s day with sleep, nutrition, exercise and fulfilling activities helps them keep focused and on track for long-term recovery.

Group 235 – Emotional Triggers: The Emotional Triggers group therapy session teaches clients to understand how certain emotions can act as triggers. The group session teaches clients to examine and understand their emotions. The group session teaches clients to identify tools that will help them avoid emotions that can act as triggers. The session is done in a group setting where clients share similar experiences. Group members motivate and encourage each other to communicate about their experiences and learn to process their reaction to these experiences.

Group 240 – Coping with Triggers: The Coping with Triggers group therapy session teaches that a trigger is any form of stimuli that initiates the desire to engage in addictive behavior. During recovery, it helps to reduce exposure to these triggers as much as possible. This may require changing relationships, moving to a different side of town or making a career change. Learning how to identify triggers and developing strategies to manage cravings are core aspects of the Palms addiction recovery program. The session is done in a group setting where clients share similar experiences. Group members motivate and encourage each other to communicate about their experiences and learn to process their reaction to these experiences. Profound friendships are formed during group therapy because many members relate to each other during recovery.

Group 245 – Enabling: The Enabling group session teaches clients that enabling can be positive and negative. Positive enabling is similar to empowerment. Negative enabling can describe dysfunctional behavior approaches that are intended to help resolve a specific problem but in fact may perpetuate or exacerbate the problem. The client takes an enabling inventory, to help them identify several examples of how others have enabled the client’s substance use to continue or progress. The kinds of enabling described should provide a springboard for a useful discussion of how enabling promotes addiction. The session is done in a group setting where clients share similar experiences. Group members encourage each other to communicate about their experiences and learn to process their reaction to these experiences.

Group 250 – Anger Management in Recovery: The Anger Management in Recovery group therapy session teaches the individual to develop a set of strategies to effectively manage anger. The Conflict Resolution Model is used for the client to act assertively. It involves five easy to remember steps: (1). Identify the Problem-the client needs to pinpoint and isolate the specific problem that is causing the interpersonal conflict. (2). Identify the Feelings-the client needs to identify and understand the feelings associated with the conflict. (3). Identify the Specific Impact-this step aims to help identify the specific impact or consequences of the problem that is causing the conflict. (4). Deciding Whether to Resolve the Conflict-when clients are faced with a conflict or a problem that is causing them anger, they are in a position to make a choice. Once they understand the conflict, its causes, and its consequences they need to decide whether they will resolve it or let it go. (5). Addressing and Resolving the Conflict-if clients decide that they will work to solve the problematic issue, it’s time to start proactively working on it. Describe how they perceive the conflict, express their feelings about it, and discuss how it can be resolved.

Group 255 – Self-Forgiveness: The Self-Forgiveness group therapy session teaches clients strength and confidence, that come through forgiveness. It’s important that the person rebuild the bridges which were burnt during your addiction, but before they seek anyone else’s forgiveness, they must forgive themselves. Recovery is a difficult process, but difficulty is always easier to bear when it’s apportioned out between individuals. The individual accepts that they can be both mindful of what they have done and still forgive themselves is crucial to their long-term recovery.

Group 260 – Guilt and Shame: The Guilt and Shame group therapy session teaches the client about the feelings of guilt and shame. Guilt is the way we see that we have done something wrong, then learn from our mistake, and move on. Shame usually stems from a negative perception of themselves. When shame is especially persistent, it usually prevents feelings of genuine concern and guilt from developing; the sense of being damaged is so powerful and painful that it crowds their feelings of empathy for others. The most productive way to get rid of shame is to forgive themselves. Another way to get rid of shame is to make amends to the people that they have harmed; this is easier said than done. Clients are taught that journaling is a great way to release pain and forgive others. The client is taught to move into the future with a renewed sense of purpose and focus on a positive change.

Group 265 – Self Esteem. The Self Esteem group therapy session teaches clients nine ways to develop good self-esteem: (1) Develop a habit of recognition, (2) Realize it’s your job to take care of you, (3) Remind yourself of the journey, (4) Don’t dwell on your mistakes, (5) Pick up an ignored hobby or learn something new, (6) Set appropriate, attainable goals, (7) Create baseline points, (8) Set aside quality time, (9) Love your recovered self. The session is done in a group setting where clients share similar experiences. Group members encourage each other to communicate about their experiences and learn to process their reaction to these experiences.

Group 270 – Thinking, Feeling and Doing: The Thinking, Feeling, and Doing group therapy session teaches clients to understand the connections among thoughts, emotions, and behavior. The group session teaches clients to understand how thoughts and emotions contribute to behavior. The group session teaches clients to understand that responses to thoughts and emotions can be controlled. The group session also teaches clients to identify behaviors that are related to substance use.

Group 275 – Sleep Therapy: The Sleep Therapy group session teaches that Cognitive behavioral therapy can be a useful, drug-free way to treat insomnia by helping the client to understand the reasons why he’s sleeping poorly — including anxiety and depression, as well as habits like too much caffeine or pre-bedtime activities such as looking at a bright computer screen. Cognitive behavioral therapy can also help to examine attitudes the client may have about sleep; for example, he might think he can get by on six hours per night, though his body needs much more. The therapist will also introduce relaxation techniques, like mindfulness meditation and progressive muscle relaxation, to help calm the clients mind and body as he winds down to bedtime. Another crucial part of a sound-sleep plan during recovery involves learning (or re-learning) healthy sleep habits. The session is done in a group setting where clients share similar experiences. Group members motivate and encourage each other to communicate about their experiences and learn to process their reaction to these experiences.

Group 280 – Truthfulness: The Truthfulness group therapy session teaches clients to understand that substance dependence and truthfulness are irreconcilable states. The group session teaches clients to acknowledge that truthfulness will not always be easy. The group session also teaches clients understand that continued truthfulness is integral to successful recovery. The session is done in a group setting where clients share similar experiences. Group members motivate and encourage each other to communicate about their experiences and learn to process their reaction to these experiences.

Group 285 – Illness: The Illness group therapy session teaches clients to understand that becoming ill can be a relapse trigger. The group session also teaches clients to understand the importance of engaging in healthful behaviors and to understand the importance of being responsible about recovery, even during illness. The session is done in a group setting where clients share similar experiences. Group members motivate and encourage each other to communicate about their experiences and learn to process their reaction to these experiences.

Group 290 – Boredom: The Boredom group therapy session teaches clients to understand that boredom poses a risk to their recovery. The group session teaches clients to understand that the situation will improve with time, and to identify new activities and techniques that will help them through their boredom. The session is done in a group setting where clients share similar experiences. Group members motivate and encourage each other to communicate about their experiences and learn to process their reaction to these experiences.

Group 295 – Staying Busy: The Staying Busy group session teaches clients to understand the importance of scheduling activities. The session teaches clients to understand how idle time can be a trigger to use. The session also teaches clients to learn and share strategies for scheduling and staying busy. The session is done in a group setting where clients share similar experiences. Group members encourage each other to communicate about their experiences and learn to process their reaction to these experiences.